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I was doing this:

(String[]) myTreeSet.toArray();

but that gives me a ClassCastException at runtime.

The only thing I can think of doing is just making an array first and then iterating through each element in myTreeSet and adding it to the array. It seems like there must be a better way than this. Is there or should I just do this?

Thanks.

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3  
    
@todda.speot.is: Thanks! – Tim Feb 12 '12 at 6:23
up vote 10 down vote accepted
String[] result = myTreeSet.toArray(new String[myTreeSet.size()]);
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That'll do it. Thank you! – Tim Feb 12 '12 at 6:23
    
Just out of curiosity, could someone explain why my way threw the exception, and why this way doesn't? – Tim Feb 12 '12 at 6:30
1  

When using toArray() the following happens: a new Object array is being allocated by using new Object[size] and each element from the array will be a reference to one of your strings element. Even if actually points to strings, it's an array with the type Object.

When using toArray(T[] a) the following happens: a new T arrays is being allocated by using

java.lang.reflect.Array
              .newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), size) 

and each from the array will be a reference to one of your strings because a.getClass().getComponentType will return String.class in your case. This time, it's an array with the type String.

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Great, thank you very much. – Tim Feb 12 '12 at 15:54

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