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Is there a way to invalidate user's cookie?

Scenario:

  1. User comes to my website (I can get any data I want);
  2. User leaves the pages;
  3. After some time a callback from another server comes with user ID. At this point, I need to invalidate user session and cookies.

With sessions, this was as simple as:

session_id($user['session_id']);
session_destroy();

How to achieve the same with cookies?

Please see comments under this post for more details and how it is related with Facebook.

The simple solution would be to replace the bit where PHP-SDK is storing information about the user from cookies to session, but going to the package file is always a bad idea.

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What exactly do you mean by “a callback from another server comes with user ID”? –  Gumbo Feb 12 '12 at 8:47
    
You're not "invalidating a cookie" so much as invalidating the permissions that cookie's data is extending to whoever is using it in conjunction with requests. One, how do you know it comes from a different server? Two, if you can determine a request is not legitimate, whatever that cookie's data references on your server to give it permission to perform actions on behalf of a user needs to be removed, ie, whatever session is indicated, or whatever else. The cookie, though, is only a transport for that data. –  Jared Farrish Feb 12 '12 at 8:51
    
@JaredFarrish The request is accepted only from Facebook server. The problem is that Facebook SDK uses cookies to get some data about the user (user ID, [..]). Now, the system design logic is this: If FB PHP-SDK tells me that there is present user ID, that means this user is authenticated -> continue to check if user is in DB. If not, get information about the user. This is where the exception is thrown since actually app no longer has access to this information. So I need to come up with a way to remove the cookie that PHP-SDK is using to store this information. –  Gajus Kuizinas Feb 12 '12 at 8:58
    
That's all relevant information to the question, Guy. As it stood, your question didn't state what you actual problem was. I would edit your question, add that description, and add a facebook and/or facebook-api tag to it. –  Jared Farrish Feb 12 '12 at 9:01
    
@Guy - I tried to update my answer with some more context on the nature of cookies, although I know it's not going to help you with your dilemma. But I think it would be helpful to understand what a cookie is literally, which is just a text string included in a header request or response between the client/server. –  Jared Farrish Feb 12 '12 at 9:17
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3 Answers

EDIT

Your other comments suggest you're not really aware of what a cookie literally is, so I apologize in advance if you already understand what I'm about to explain.

Although I suspect you need some Facebook-specific help in answering or resolving your actual concern, I'd like to point out what a cookie actually is:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-type: text/html
Set-Cookie: name=value
Set-Cookie: name2=value2; Expires=Wed, 09 Jun 2021 10:18:14 GMT

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_cookie#Setting_a_cookie

This is how cookies are transmitted between the client and server (requester/responder). You can use the Net tab in Firebug or Chrome Console to see for yourself how requests are made and what data is sent back and forth. They are not by nature "logged" systematically, are not finite "things" per se, but simply part of a header which is included in the packet of the request and response, something like a CC/BCC field in an email header: pseudo-transient but descriptive.

To accomplish an effect of Cookies are validated before consuming, you would need to determine how to attach a reference ID to the cookie, or (alternately) detect a specific cookie with a calculated code that must be present when the other data is submitted in a request. Another approach is described in Jan's answer.

Cookies, though, are not typically handled this way. They're just transports, means to an end, filling a void between GET and POST.


You're not "invalidating a cookie" so much as invalidating the permissions that cookie's data is extending to whoever is using it in conjunction with requests.

One, how do you know it comes from a different server? Two, if you can determine a request is not legitimate, whatever that cookie's data references on your server to give it permission to perform actions on behalf of a user needs to be removed, ie, whatever session is indicated is ended/destroyed, or whatever else.

The cookie, though, is only a transport for that data. You have to be able to intercept, detect, and block whatever access it provides it's holder with to render it "useless".

If you're asking something specific, please provide more information. But essentially it seems as if all you need to do is have a way to ignore cookies which contain data that you've identified as not valid or authentic or provides improper access (to imposters).

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You can't set (unset/invalidate) a cookie for a user that is not making a request to your server directly. You will have to do some more work.

I would go this way about it:

Store which cookies have you set for a user somewhere (db, redis, whatever). This way wou will know which cookies user has. Then when a request to invalidate comes, mark cookies for that user in your storage as deleted (or something like that). Then every time a user requests your page check if he has any deleted cookies in your storage. If he has destroy his session and invalidate his cookies there (setting them in the past for instance).

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Cookie lives in the client side, you can do nothing with it in the server side. However if your "After some time" means the cookie should be expired after some time, you should set the expire time when you set the cookie. You don't need to worry about whether the user is still on his page or not, because if he leaves and access again after some time, the browser will deal it for you.

For example, the code below shows how to set an cookie which should be expired after 1 hour.

$value = 'something from somewhere';

setcookie("TestCookie", $value);
setcookie("TestCookie", $value, time()+3600);  /* expire in 1 hour */
setcookie("TestCookie", $value, time()+3600, "/~rasmus/", "example.com", 1);
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It doesn't make sense. There must be some sort of reference ID on the system that approves the cookie server side before using it. –  Gajus Kuizinas Feb 12 '12 at 9:01
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@Guy - Cookies don't by nature have reference IDs. They really are just used to transport (in most cases) short snippets of data as part of a header between a client and server. –  Jared Farrish Feb 12 '12 at 9:04
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