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I am styling my top level <li> to look like tabs. and on rollover a div shows but if there are nested <ul> <li>'s in the div they inherit the same tab style as the top level <li>'s

below is my style:

#menu li a {
    font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    font-size:13px; 
    color: #ffffff;
    display:block;
    outline:0;
    text-decoration:none;
    padding:10px 9px 2px 9px;
    /* Background color and gradients */

    background: #da0000;
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #b80202, #da0000);
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 0% 100%, from(#b80202), to(#da0000));

    /* Rounded corners */

    -moz-border-radius: 5px 5px 0px 0px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px 5px 0px 0px;
    border-radius: 5px 5px 0px 0px;
}

This is my HTML

<li>
    <a href="#">Headquarters</a>
    <div class="dropdown_2columns">
        <div class="col_2">
            <ul>
                <li><a href="board.php">Board</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Staff</a></li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    </div>
</li>

I thought adding a class to the top level <li> would help but no luck. Is there something I am missing? when the code above runs "Board" and "Staff" both have a red tab effect on them.

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Could you show a more complete sample of the HTML wrapping the list so that we can see which element has the ID of menu? –  Jim Jeffers Feb 12 '12 at 9:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, adding a class to the top level <li> won't work - because the inner <a>'s will still be affected by:

#menu li.myclass a

I.e., they're anchor elements inside a <li> with class "myclass".

Instead, you can change the rule to:

#menu > li > a

... meaning, only <a>'s that are immediate children of <li>'s, which are immediate children of #menu, will be affected (IE6 doesn't support this). This is assuming it's your <ul> that has the id "menu".

Or you could use (mostly for IE6 compatibility):

#menu li li a
{
    /* Undo styles you applied to #menu li a */
}

Note that in this, you'll have to reset/undo/"overwrite" all the styles previously set on #menu li a that you don't want to apply to the inner anchors.

An alternative for IE6 - where you won't need to reset/undo styles - is to set a class on the <a>'s rather than the <li>'s:

#menu li a.tab
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I actually got it to work using #menu > ul > li > a{} Just so I know in the future do I just have to use background:none; to remove the styles set prior? –  Denoteone Feb 12 '12 at 8:56
1  
You'd need to reset all of them, if using the last option. Mostly that one is only useful for IE6 compatibility. In this case, yep, background: none, but also any other attribute you've set in #menu li a, which you don't want to apply to #menu li li a –  JimmiTh Feb 12 '12 at 9:02

You are targeting all As that are in LIs, so this behavior is as it should be.

There are many solutions to this "problem". The easiest way would be to target (with your CSS selector) just the first level of LIs with the "child selector":

#menu > li > a {
  ...
}

This should only affect the first level of As in the LIs.

share|improve this answer
    
[not the downvoter] Actually it would target the first level of li in #menu (and it must be a direct descendant, i.e. #menu needs to be the ID of the ul). You still match all a elements underneath the matched li. And if desiring IE 6 compatibility this needs to be rephrased too. –  Joey Feb 12 '12 at 8:53
    
That makes sense but I am still seeing the red tab effect. I will post all of my menu div just to make sure the hierarchy is correct. *Although it did fix another rollover issue (thanks). –  Denoteone Feb 12 '12 at 8:53
    
I assumed that they are inside a ul#menu based on the CSS provided, so my solution is OK. –  Jan Hančič Feb 12 '12 at 8:54
    
Still a happy non-owner of the "critic" badge - but I think the problem is exactly what @Joey describes. You're targeting all <a>'s inside first level <li>'s - which ends up applying to the same elements as Denoteone's attempt. –  JimmiTh Feb 12 '12 at 8:57
1  
There is a edit pending that needs to be confirmed from one other user ... –  Jan Hančič Feb 12 '12 at 9:02

I think this is impossible to answer without seeing a more complete snippet of the HTML. At the moment folks answering have to assume which element has the ID of #menu.

If the HTML looks like this:

<div id="menu">
  <ul>
    <li>
      <a href="#">Headquarters</a>
      <div class="dropdown_2columns">
        <div class="col_2">
          <ul>
            <li><a href="board.php">Board</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Staff</a></li>
          </ul>
        </div>
      </div>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

Then the solution would be:

#menu > ul > li > a { ... }

If the code looks like this:

<ul id="menu">
  <li>
    <a href="#">Headquarters</a>
    <div class="dropdown_2columns">
      <div class="col_2">
        <ul>
          <li><a href="board.php">Board</a></li>
          <li><a href="#">Staff</a></li>
        </ul>
      </div>
    </div>
  </li>
</ul>

Then the correct selector would be:

#menu > li > a { ... }

If it doesn't look like either of those snippets, then I'll need to see more of your code in order to better answer your question!

One more thing -- if you want to be even more specific you can also use first-child which would be implemented as:

#menu > ul > li > a:first-child { ... }

or...

#menu > li > a:first-child { ... }

...depending on your HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree but I could not update my code because someone had it open to edit it and never closed it. Thanks for you answer. –  Denoteone Feb 12 '12 at 20:44

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