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I would like to combine arrrays @a, @b, and @c into a single array with multiple data elements, for example OpenStruct:

@a = ["my", "foo", "bar"]
@b = ["yan", "can", "cook"]
@c = ["in", "your", "dreams"]

the output would be like:

[
  { :a => "my",  :b => "yan",  :c => "in" },
  { :a => "foo", :b => "can",  :c => "your" },
  { :a => bar,   :b => "cook", :c => "dreams" }
]

What is the fastest way to do this? Should I consider another class?

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What do you mean about OpenStruct? Do you want to get array of OpenStruct objects with a, b, and c attributes instead of hashes? –  KL-7 Feb 12 '12 at 9:47
    
Note that usually the "best" solution (easier to understand? more modular?) is not the fastest. –  tokland Feb 12 '12 at 10:08
    
what about for performance, whats the best? –  hagope Feb 12 '12 at 10:18
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is one solution, I am not quite convinced it is the neatest though:

@a.zip(@b, @c).map {|t| {:a => t[0], :b => t[1], :c => t[2]}}
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3  
I would prefer to use destructuring bind here, I usually find it much more readable: @a.zip(@b, @c).map {|a, b, c| {:a => a, :b => b, :c => c}} –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 12 '12 at 14:38
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The best way to know the fastest way is do a benchmark. Based on previous answers:

require 'benchmark'

@a = ["my", "foo", "bar"]
@b = ["yan", "can", "cook"]
@c = ["in", "your", "dreams"]
$n = 500_000

Benchmark.bmbm do |x|
  x.report("Boris Strandjev") do $n.times do
    @a.zip(@b, @c).map {|t| {:a => t[0], :b => t[1], :c => t[2]}}
  end end
  x.report("tokland") do $n.times do
    [@a, @b, @c].transpose.map { |xs| Hash[[:a, :b, :c].zip(xs)] }
  end end
  x.report("mu is too short") do $n.times do
    (0 ... [@a, @b, @c].max_by(&:length).length).map { |i| { :a => @a[i], :b => @b[i], :c => @c[i] } }
  end end
  x.report("KL-7") do $n.times do
    @a.each_with_index.map { |a, i| { :a => a, :b => @b[i], :c => @c[i] } }
  end end
end

Output:

Rehearsal ---------------------------------------------------
Boris Strandjev   4.540000   0.015000   4.555000 (  4.571261)
tokland           7.145000   0.000000   7.145000 (  7.268415)
mu is too short   5.304000   0.047000   5.351000 (  5.560318)
KL-7              4.914000   0.000000   4.914000 (  5.030287)
----------------------------------------- total: 21.965000sec

                      user     system      total        real
Boris Strandjev   4.462000   0.016000   4.478000 (  4.553260)
tokland           7.129000   0.031000   7.160000 (  7.309418)
mu is too short   5.366000   0.031000   5.397000 (  5.447312)
KL-7              4.898000   0.016000   4.914000 (  4.997286)
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this is very useful, thanks! –  hagope Feb 12 '12 at 18:13
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Functional approach:

[@a, @b, @c].transpose.map { |xs| Hash[[:a, :b, :c].zip(xs)] }
#=> [{:a=>"my", :b=>"yan", :c=>"in"}, {:a=>"foo", :b=>"can", :c=>"your"}, {:a=>"bar", :b=>"cook", :c=>"dreams"}] 
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Something like this should work:

(0 ... [@a, @b, @c].max_by(&:length).length).map { |i| { :a => @a[i], :b => @b[i], :c => @c[i] } }

That doesn't assume they're all the same length but you'll get nil values if they're not.

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If there is no need to worry about arrays having different length I think that's the fastest way (as it iterate over array only once):

@a.each_with_index.map { |a, i| { :a => a, :b => @b[i], :c => @c[i] } }
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for simetry, I'd write: 3.times.map { |i| {:a => @a[i], :b => @b[i], :c => @c[i]} } –  tokland Feb 12 '12 at 13:34
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