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I've been creating Presigned HTTP PUT URLs and everything was working great until I wanted to start using "folders" in S3; I wanted the key to have the character '/'.

Now I get Signature doesn't match when I send the HTTP PUT requests due to the fact the '/' probably changes to %2F... If I escape the character before creating the presigned URL it works great, but then the Amazon console management doesn't understand it and shows it as one file instead of subfolders.

Any idea?

P.s.
The HTTP PUT requests are sent using C++ with POCO NET library.

EDIT
I'm using Poco HttpRequest from C++ to my Java web server to generate a signed url (returned on the response).
C++ then uses this url to put a file in s3 using Poco again.
The problem was that the urls returned from the web server were parsed through Poco URI objects that auto decoded the s3 object key thus changing it.
With that in mind I was able to fix my problem.

share|improve this question
    
Presumably you mean the Network library (i.e. the Poco::Net namespace) from POCO C++ libraries? –  Steffen Opel Feb 12 '12 at 15:47
    
Yep, that's the one –  Chen Harel Feb 13 '12 at 12:56
    
Its likely a bug in your code or a library you are using, as I do pre signed https puts to 'folders' S3, building the URLs and forms using ruby and the AWS-SDK ruby package. –  Tom Andersen Feb 13 '12 at 17:28
    
@Chook: Which channel is actually used to communicate the pre-signed URL generated by the AWS Java SDK to C++ in turn (see the last paragraph of my answer for the background)? –  Steffen Opel Feb 13 '12 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Tricky - I'll try to approach this bottom up.

Disclaimer: I got carried away visually inspecting the Poco libraries instead of actually debugging a code sample, which should yield more reliable results much faster, see below ;)

Analysis

If I escape the character before creating the presigned URL it works great, but then the Amazon console management doesn't understand it and shows it as one file instead of subfolders.

The latter stems from S3 not having a concept of folders on the storage level actually, see e.g. section Index Documents and Folders within Index Document Support:

Objects stored in Amazon S3 are stored within a flat container, i.e., an Amazon S3 bucket, and it does not provide any hierarchical organization, similar to a file system's. However, you can create a logical hierarchy using object key names and use these names to infer logical folders that contain these objects.

That's exactly what the AWS Management Console is doing here as well:

The AWS Management Console also supports the concept of folders, by using the same key naming convention used in the preceding sample.

However, your test regarding the assumption of / being encoded as %2F proves, that this is indeed how Poco::Net is encoding the URL when performing the HTTP PUT request.

Potential Solution

In order for your scenario to work as desired, you'll need to figure out where the URL is encoded this way - I could think of two components in principle:

Poco::Net

Finding out why Poco::Net is encoding the URL different than S3 (if at all, see below) is best done by debugging your code, here's where I'd start:

Class HTTPRequest uses class URI in turn, which automatically performs a few normalizations on all URIs and URI parts passed to it, in particular percent-encoded characters are decoded. The other way round is handled by method encode(), which is where things get interesting and call for a breakpoint, see URI.cpp:

  • lines 575 ff. - here encode() does its magic, which indeed seems to be in place, insofar neither the code within the function nor the various chars passed in via the reserved parameter contain the offending / (see lines 47 ff. for the respective constants in use)
  • consequently you might want to set a breakpoint in this function and backtrace the callstack to find out which code is actually doing the encoding upfront, which might not yield an offender at all, see below.

Java => C++ transition

You haven't specified yet, which channel is actually used to communicate the pre-signed URL generated by the AWS Java SDK to C++ in turn. Given the code review (mind you, visual inspection only, I haven't debugged this myself yet) of the Poco::Net functionality yields the conclusion, that no obvious offender can be identified in the library itself, thus it seems more likely that it might already enter your C++ layer encoded (easily verified via debugging of course) - are you by chance using any kind of web service between these components for example?

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Steffen, Thanks for the answer. The URI constructor was indeed the one who "made the problem" with his auto decoding. I'll edit the question for future reference. –  Chen Harel Feb 14 '12 at 10:08
    
Glad you found the problem - and thanks for following up with your solution in turn (+1)! –  Steffen Opel Feb 14 '12 at 10:31

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