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I have this file from the theme of my Magento store:

http://www.princessly.com/js/jquery/jquery-1.4.2.min.js

And someone (the theme was bought) added one extra line of code at the end of it:

jQuery.noConflict();

This javascript file is used on every page of my store: a product page.

My question is, what does that line do there? What does it mean?

I wanted to use the Google hosted version but as it doesn't have jQuery.noConflict(); at the end, I thought it might not be appropriate for my site because jQuery.noConflict(); may be needed. But I don't know why it's needed. Or is it?

Can I safely change http://www.princessly.com/js/jquery/jquery-1.4.2.min.js to a Google hosted version?

Can some one enlighten me on this, please? Thanks a lot!

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1  
api.jquery.com/jQuery.noConflict –  Holger Just Feb 12 '12 at 10:23
    
Search in google for it will save more time. –  xdazz Feb 12 '12 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Currently, you will require noConflict mode in order to run jQuery in a Magento installation (because it ships with Prototype). This doesn't necessarily mean you can't use the Google CDN version though. You just need to make sure you add your own JavaScript file that get's loaded after, but before prototype, that will set noConflict.

Not exactly helpful to you now, but Magento 2 will use jQuery rather than Prototype.

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It tell's the jQuery lib to remove all jQuery variables from the global scope. That way you can use it alongside another library which depends on the $ for example (without conflict). Another such library might be prototype.js. If you're is exclusively using jQuery and your local javascript isn't reassigning $ then your ok to remove that line.

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