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Andrew Troelsen in his book Pro C# 2008 and the .NET 3.5 Platform, Fourth Edition says while explaining newobj instruction from CLR page no. 248, second last para

Garbage collector temporarily suspends all active threads within the current process to ensure that the application does not access the heap during the collection process

If GC suspends current process only then how does it make sure all processes along with current process can not access the heap and avoid any processing on an object which has just been collected provided GC processes entire heap or Andrew just summarized the process for beginners ?

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Make sure that you typed "thread" and "process" carefully. "how does it make sure all processes" here it should be "all threads", right? –  Lex Li Feb 12 '12 at 11:45
    
From technet.microsoft.com/en-us/query/678ysw69 you should be able to see what Andrew means. –  Lex Li Feb 12 '12 at 11:49
    
I intentionally wrote processes to highlight all threads of all processes but not all threads of current process except GC's –  bjan Feb 12 '12 at 11:52
    
the article describes thread suspension by GC but not current vs all processes. Does Andrew means only one process (even in multi core) would be active for the given time and all rest would already be in in-active mode so GC is required to suspend threads of current process only? –  bjan Feb 12 '12 at 11:59
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That means you don't even understand how CLR is hosted (it is one CLR per process), and you should go back to that ABC first. Garbage collector only needs to suspend active threads (managed) in the process who hosts this copy of CLR, and then start collecting. It never needs to jump to another process. –  Lex Li Feb 12 '12 at 11:59
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We may go back to a fact that CLR is hosted per process. Then what Andrew describes is easier to understand.

Garbage collector only needs to suspend active threads (managed) in the process who hosts this copy of CLR, and then start collecting. It never needs to jump to another process.

References:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/query/678ysw69

CLR via C# book

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It is not an issue, every process gets its own virtual memory space. And therefore its own heap. Another process cannot access your heap, Windows puts up a big wall between processes to ensure that one faulting process cannot destabilize another.

Processes do share memory but only for code, not data. There's only one copy of the ngen-ed framework code, CLR and jitter in RAM, shared by all processes that execute managed code. Not otherwise relevant to the question, that memory doesn't get garbage collected.

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@HansPasant Do you mean mscoree.dll, mscorlib.dll, mscorjit.dll and others are not loaded in each executable assembly's virtual memory but loaded globally and then shared by other processes? –  bjan Feb 12 '12 at 13:17
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The processes simply share the same memory pages. There's only one copy of them in RAM. –  Hans Passant Feb 12 '12 at 13:20
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