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Few days back I had an interview with Qualcomm. I was kinnda stucked to one question, the question thou looked very simple but neither me nor the interviewer were satisfied with my answers, if anyone can provide any good solution to this problem.

The question is:

Multiply 2 numbers without using any loops and additions and of course no multiplication and division.

To which I replied: recursion

He said anything else at very low level.

To which the genuine thought that came to my mind was bit shifting, but bit shifting will only multiply the number by power of 2 and for other numbers we finally have to do a addition.

For example: 10 * 7 can be done as: (binary of 7 ~~ 111) 10<< 2 + 10<<1 + 10 40 + 20 + 10 = 70

But again addition was not allowed.

Any thoughts on this issue guys.

share|improve this question
    
Is multiplication allowed? –  Kos Feb 12 '12 at 12:16
2  
Is the * operator allowed? –  ouah Feb 12 '12 at 12:16
    
hehe ofcourse not... no multiplication no "*" and no division. –  Genelia D'souza Feb 12 '12 at 12:22
5  
Seriously, Qualcomm should just invest in a good * operator instead. But this explains alot. –  bzlm Feb 12 '12 at 12:35
2  
That's about the same as asking some one to make an omelette without eggs. –  pmg Feb 12 '12 at 12:37

8 Answers 8

Here is a solution just using lookup, addition and shifting. The lookup does not require multiplication as it is an array of pointers to another array - hence addition required to find the right array. Then using the second value you can repeat pointer arithmetic and get the lookup result.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  /* Note:As this is an array of pointers to an array of values, addition is
     only required for the lookup.

     i.e. 

     First part: lookup + a value -> A pointer to an array
     Second part - Add a value to the pointer to above pointer to get the value
  */
  unsigned char lookup[16][16] = {
    { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 },
    { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 },
    { 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 },
    { 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45 },
    { 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60 },
    { 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75 },
    { 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72, 78, 84, 90 },
    { 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70, 77, 84, 91, 98, 105 },
    { 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80, 88, 96, 104, 112, 120 },
    { 0, 9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90, 99, 108, 117, 126, 135 },
    { 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150 },
    { 0, 11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66, 77, 88, 99, 110, 121, 132, 143, 154, 165 },
    { 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144, 156, 168, 180 },
    { 0, 13, 26, 39, 52, 65, 78, 91, 104, 117, 130, 143, 156, 169, 182, 195 },
    { 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84, 98, 112, 126, 140, 154, 168, 182, 196, 210 },
    { 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165, 180, 195, 210, 225 }
  };
  unsigned short answer, mult;
  unsigned char x, y, a, b;

  x = (unsigned char)atoi(argv[1]);
  y = (unsigned char)atoi(argv[2]);
  printf("Multiple %d by %d\n", x, y);

  answer = 0;
  /* First nibble of x, First nibble of y */
  a = x & 0xf;
  b = y & 0xf;
  mult = lookup[a][b];
  answer += mult;
  printf("Looking up %d, %d get %d - Answer so far %d\n", a, b, mult, answer);

  /* First nibble of x, Second nibble of y */
  a = x & 0xf;
  b = (y & 0xf0) >> 4;
  mult = lookup[a][b];
  answer += mult << 4;
  printf("Looking up %d, %d get %d - Answer so far %d\n", a, b, mult, answer);

  /* Second nibble of x, First nibble of y */
  a = (x & 0xf0) >> 4;
  b = y & 0xf;
  mult = lookup[a][b];
  answer += mult << 4;
  printf("Looking up %d, %d get %d - Answer so far %d\n", a, b, mult, answer);

  /* Second nibble of x, Second nibble of y */
  a = (x & 0xf0) >> 4;
  b = (y & 0xf0) >> 4;
  mult = lookup[a][b];
  answer += mult << 8;
  printf("Looking up %d, %d get %d - Answer so far %d\n", a, b, mult, answer);

  return 0;
} 
share|improve this answer

Perhaps you could recursively add, using bitwise operations as a replacement for the addition operator. See: Adding Two Numbers With Bitwise and Shift Operators

share|improve this answer

You can separate your problems by first implementing the addition and then the multiplication based on the addition.

For the addition, implement what they do on processors at the gate level using the C bitwise operators:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_adder

Then for the multiplication, with the addition you implemented, use goto statements and labels so no loop statement (the for, while and do iteration statements) will be used.

share|improve this answer

How about multiplication tables?

share|improve this answer
1  
can you elaborate please... –  Fahim Parkar Feb 12 '12 at 12:25
    
Technically this is the easiest,fastest implementation but consumes memory. For ex a 4bit x 4bit can have max 8 bit data output which can be realized by a multiplexer! However this method is bad for large numbers. Still beats the problem -_- –  Akshay Feb 12 '12 at 13:16
    
can you provide example what are you saying.. multiplication tables –  Fahim Parkar Feb 12 '12 at 13:18
    
Well, lets say you want to multiply 3*8. 3-> 0011; 4->0100. Their multiplication is 8 bits(necessary) is 12 which is 00001100. Build a ROM or multiplexer which takes 8 bits as input (4 bits of 2 numbers). The ROM quickly searches the input and produces output just be looking at the internal tables. ie; the tables contain data such that 00110100(3,4) maps to 00001100(12) and so on for the list of possible combinations of 4 bit numbers. –  Akshay Feb 12 '12 at 13:25
    
In fact "Ed Heal" just posted a C program with the same idea :) –  Akshay Feb 12 '12 at 13:33

What about russian peasant multiplication without using addition? Is there an easy way (a few lines, no loops) to simulate addition using only AND, OR, XOR and NOT?

share|improve this answer
    
alex reynolds had what i was looking for. cool. –  Cris Stringfellow Feb 12 '12 at 12:25

You can implement addition by bits operators. But still, if you want to avoid loops, you should write a lot of code. (I used to implement multiplication without arithmetic operators, but I use loop, shifting the index until it became zero. If it can help you, tell me, and I will search the file)

share|improve this answer

Question: Multiply 2 numbers without using any loops and additions and of course no multiplication and division.

Multiplication is defined in terms of addition. It is impossible not to find addition in an implementation of multiplication.

Arbitrary precision numbers cannot be multiplied without loop/recursion.

Multiplication of two numbers of fixed bit-lengths can be implemented via a table lookup. The problem is the size of the table. Generating the table requires addition.

The answer is: It cannot be done.

share|improve this answer

You could use logarithms and subtraction instead.

log(a*b) = log(a) + log(b)
a+b = -(-a-b)
exp(log(a)) = a

round(exp(-(-log(a)-log(b))))
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