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I have a timer class set up that is basically handling all of count down timer logic. All it does is on button press - counts from 60 to 0 seconds.

I have the following code in a Timer.m class.

- (void)advanceTimer
{
    self.lengthOfTime = [NSNumber numberWithInt:self.lengthOfTime.intValue - 1];
    NSLog(@"%@",self.lengthOfTime);
    [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(advanceTimer) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}
- (void)startCountdown
{
    if (!self.lengthOfTime) self.lengthOfTime = [NSNumber numberWithInt:60];
    [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(advanceTimer) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}

What I am looking to do is create a timer object in my View Controller that will update a label from the ViewController.m. Currently - the class works because I can NSLog from the Timer class and it counts down correctly. I thought about having the advanceTimer method return - but I can't seem to wrap my head around how to update the label in the ViewController with the returned data.

The only way I cold get the return to work was to have a button that refreshed the label to the correct countdown time... I can't get it to automatically count down...

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why don't you update label from your view controller??? –  Inder Kumar Rathore Feb 12 '12 at 13:02
    
Crap - that is what I meant... my view controller. Rookie - I know... That is what I am actually trying to do. I have the Timer class - but can't figure out how to update the label in the View Controller with the Timer class... I will update the post –  dingerkingh Feb 12 '12 at 13:18
    
I think implementing a class for timer and then using that is a very complicated thing.. why don't you use theses two methods directly in the View Controller class and directly access the label in it? –  Inder Kumar Rathore Feb 12 '12 at 13:23
1  
Well - I guess I don't have a reason... For some reason I thought it made more sense to have the timer class be all on it's own... but as it appears - that may not be the case. I guess the main reason was I thought it would allow me to be able to build off of the class in the future. I guess that could still be done if I just moved the code to the view controller –  dingerkingh Feb 12 '12 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, if you know how to update a label by clicking a button, you have everything in place to connect everything else:

If your view controller has an IBOutlet for the label and an IBAction that updates it, why not call the view-controller's action in your advanceTimer method?

Yet easier, you could connect your timer class to the label. You might do it like this:

// Timer.h:
@interface Timer : NSObject

@property (retain, nonatomic) IBOutlet UILabel *timeLabel;
@property (assign, nonatomic) NSInteger secondsRemaining;
@property (assign, nonatomic) NSTimer *timer;

- (IBAction)startCountdown:(id)sender;
- (IBAction)stopCountdown:(id)sender;
- (void)timerFired:(NSTimer *)timer;

@end

// Timer.m
@implementation Timer

@synthesize timeLabel = timeLabel_;
@synthesize secondsRemaining = secondsRemaining;
@synthesize timer = timer_;

- (void)setTimer:(NSTimer *)timer
{
    if (timer = timer_)
        return;

    [timer_ invalidate];
    timer_ = timer;
}

- (void)scheduleTimer
{
    if (self.secondsRemaining <= 0) {
        self.timer = nil;
    } else {
        self.timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(timerFired:) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
    }
}

- (void)timerFired:(NSTimer *)timer
{
    self.secondsRemaining -= 1;
    NSString *displayString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", self.secondsRemaining];
    self.timeLabel.text = displayString;
    [self scheduleTimer];
}

- (IBAction)startCountdown:(id)sender
{
    self.secondsRemaining = 60;
    [self scheduleTimer];
}

- (IBAction)stopCountdown:(id)sender
{
    self.timer = nil;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [timeLabel_ release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@end

This code has a two benefits:

  • You can cancel your timer.
  • Your view controller does not need to know anything about this — you can set this up in interface builder, entirely.
share|improve this answer
    
Good point about adding the IBAction to the class... This definitely seems like the easiest route for a beginner such as myself. –  dingerkingh Feb 12 '12 at 19:24

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you should retain that NSTimer in a class member. Otherwise the timer is destroyed when finishing the method.

@property (nonatomic,retain) NSTimer * yourTimer;

In the .m file

@synthesize yourTimer;

And then

- (void)advanceTimer
{
self.lengthOfTime = [NSNumber numberWithInt:self.lengthOfTime.intValue - 1];
NSLog(@"%@",self.lengthOfTime);
self.yourTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(advanceTimer)     userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}
- (void)startCountdown
{
if (!self.lengthOfTime) self.lengthOfTime = [NSNumber numberWithInt:60];
self.yourTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(advanceTimer) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}

I fixed also your NSNumber alloc, so there are no memory leaks ;) Explaining it, NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval: gives you an NSTimer with autorelease. If this Timer is not retained by some member, it gets released as soon as the method ends and, since no other pointer is retaining it, it gets freed. Maybe that's the explanation ;). Never worked with NSTimers

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Thanks for pointing out the leak! It bugs me that I still make those stupid mistakes... –  dingerkingh Feb 12 '12 at 13:20
1  
@Lupi The timer is not destroyed or anything when the method exits: 1. When an NSTimer is scheduled on a runloop, the runloop retains the timer for as long as it is not invalidated. I.e. the timer need not be stored in a strong/retained property. 2. Even if that was not the case, autoreleased objects are not released when the enclosing scope is popped of the stack, but when the enclosing autorelease-pool is drained — this usually happens quite a while later. –  danyowdee Feb 12 '12 at 17:05

The countdown class needs to save a link back to the ViewController and then call a method on it.

One approach would be to use the delegate pattern. Have the Countdown class's init method as initWithDelegate:(id)delegate and a predefined callback method (like updateCountdown:(NSNumber*)currentCountdown). The ViewController sends itself as the delegate and implements the update method.

Another approach is the target/action pattern. NSTimer uses this approach. The init method would be initWithTarget:(id)target selector:(SEL)selector. The ViewController sends itself as the target and whatever selector it wants to use (as long as it takes an NSNumber as it's sole argument).

In both cases in advanceTimer the Countdown class will use performSelector:withObject: to call the ViewController's update method.

If you really want a true one second timer then set it to repeat. Otherwise you will drift slowly by the amount of time the advanceTimer method takes to fire and complete. At the end of the countdown use a reference to the timer to invalidate it.

share|improve this answer
    
Minor remark: invalidating a timer that you are the target of in dealloc is moot. NSTimer retains its target i.e. your dealloc will not be called as long as the timer itself is not deallocated. –  danyowdee Feb 12 '12 at 18:08
    
@danyowdee Good point –  Nathan Kinsinger Feb 12 '12 at 18:13
    
I had thought of using a delegate - but I don't have to expertise to pull it off... Thanks for your thoughts and I will have a look further at it. –  dingerkingh Feb 12 '12 at 19:22

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