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How can I get the duration in terms of minutes by subtracting a previous time stamp stored in a DB from the present time in C#?

The previous time stamp format is 13:00.

I want to calculate how many minutes have passed. How to do it?

Plus the fact that the previous datetime Stamp is stored in a DB as e.g.13:00 (hh:mm). So I do not understand how I am able to substract 13:00 from the current DateTime.Now.ToShortString().

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Sounds like you have a pretty good handle on the meta-problem... Get the time from the database, get now. Subtract db from now. What exactly is your problem? Without more details, it's hard to help. Are you having issues getting the time from the database? Date parsing? How to subtract datetimes? How to deal with timespans? How to format the output? –  32bitkid Feb 12 '12 at 13:25
    
@32bitkid Sorry I am new to C#. Basically how to subtract the datetimes, dealing with timespans and then formatting the output into minutes? –  Seesharp Feb 12 '12 at 13:29
    
Do you have a date for your timestamp or only the time? –  Fox32 Feb 12 '12 at 13:37
    
@Fox32 only have the time as 13:00 stored in the database –  Seesharp Feb 12 '12 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can substract two DateTime objects and get a TimeSpan object. Than use TimeSpan.TotalMinutes.

DateTime dateTimeFromDatabase = DateTime.Parse("13:00");

double minutes = (DateTime.Now - dateTimeFromDatabase).TotalMinutes;
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Thanks am a try this now. –  Seesharp Feb 12 '12 at 13:37
    
Thanks just had to convert it to int to display it as 53 and not not 53.711, otherwise it works great thanks. –  Seesharp Feb 12 '12 at 13:53

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