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I am implementing a smartpointer-template and there is one thing that boogles me; how do I increase the reference counter when passing a smartpointer as a parameter to another function? What operator do I overload to increase ref count?

For example:

class test
{
   test() {  }
   ~test() {  }
};

void A() 
{
    SmartPointer<test> p;
    B(p);
}

void B(SmartPointer<test> p)
{
    C(p);
}

void C(SmartPointer<test> p)
{
    // p ref count is still 1 and will be destroyed at end of C
}

Thanks

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1  
¤ If you implement the ref-count calls yourself, you have to do that in every constructor (including copy constructor) and the destructor. But you don't have to. Just use boost::intrusive_ptr -- which despite the name doesn't need to be used to implement an intrusive pointer, it just takes care of them ref-count calls. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 12 '12 at 15:03
    
Be warned. Even the smartest C++ guys have trouble writing a correct smart pointer. Scott Myers talks about his attempt often in his lectures (even 5 years after publication (after it was reviewed extensively before publication)) he says he still gets e-mails about it. The smart pointers in the standard have had 100 of thousands of people looking at them to check them out to make sure there are no mistakes. –  Loki Astari Feb 12 '12 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

All constructors of your smart pointer must manipulate the refcount, including the copy constructor, and the assignment operator must also be involved.

If this puzzles you, it might be too early for you to write your own smart pointers; instead, you could use the high-quality std::shared_ptr for the time being.

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What is the copy constructor? –  KaiserJohaan Feb 12 '12 at 22:01
1  
@KaiserJohaan: It's a constructor with signature T::T(T const &) or T::T(T &), usually the former. –  Kerrek SB Feb 12 '12 at 22:47

When you pass a parameter it is copied, which will call the copy constructor. It is generally a good idea to overload the equality operator at the same time.

Either that or use boost::shared_ptr or some other per-existing class. Is ther some reason you are not using this?

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What is the copy constructor? –  KaiserJohaan Feb 12 '12 at 22:01

It should be taken care of in your copy constructor, and also your assignment operator.

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