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Is it possible to somehow declare the global scope as a friend of a class?

The problem I am facing is the following:

class Foo
{
    Foo() {}
};

Foo foo; //error: 'Foo::Foo()' is private

So, what I want is to be able to declare an object of Foo at the global scope but not anywhere else.

Note that this question is purely out of interest, I'm not trying to solve an actual problem.

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Nope, you can't. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 12 '12 at 15:10
    
@Seth: I didn't suppose it would be possible using friends but maybe there is some workaround to get the same behavior. –  Job Feb 12 '12 at 15:12
    
You want singleton behaviour, and there is planty of methods creating singleton's –  Lol4t0 Feb 12 '12 at 15:13
1  
Not necessarily, he just wants to be able to create only global objects. There's no way to do this though because an object can't tell in what scope it's being created. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 12 '12 at 15:15
    
@Lol4t0: Well, no. Maybe I want to be able to declare more than one Foo object at global scope or declare some other classes/functions as friends and let them be able to also create Foo objects. –  Job Feb 12 '12 at 15:15
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, it's not possible to do that. You can only name specific classes or functions as friends. It's not possible to make a namespace including the global namespace a friend.

I think the reason there isn't a good work around is that when you define a class or function, only one definition is allowed (not considering overloads, which are really different functions). But, you are allowed to open a namespace as many times as you want and append extra stuff into it each time. So, if you allowed access to a particular namespace, anybody who wanted to could type:

namespace TheNamesapceWithAccess
{
  // I've got access to it here too as well as
  // to the original namespace definition that was
  // the only one that was intended to be allowed access.
  // And I could define a function here that allows access the private thing
  // from outside this namespace. I've just subverted the access restriction
  // you intended.
}
share|improve this answer
    
True, I was just hoping that somebody would come up with a clever workaround. –  Job Feb 12 '12 at 15:30
    
I'm not clever enough. If I could think of a workaround, I would have answered with one. :) But, as far as I know, I think 'no' is the correct answer. –  Scott Langham Feb 12 '12 at 15:35
    
That's what I was afraid of. Anyway, I'll wait a little to see if something comes up before accepting your answer. –  Job Feb 12 '12 at 15:38
    
I think the reason there isn't a good work around is that when you define a class or function, only one definition is allowed (not considering overloads, which are really different functions). But, you are allowed to open a namespace as many times as you want and append extra stuff into it each time. So, if you allowed access to a particular namespace, anybody who wanted to could type: namespace TheNamesapceWithAccess { /* I've got access to it here too as well as to the original namespace definition that was the only one that was intended to be allowed access */ } –  Scott Langham Feb 12 '12 at 15:38
    
That's actually a very good reasoning. Maybe you could add that to your answer? –  Job Feb 12 '12 at 15:40
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