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I was reading about SOLID and other design principles. I thought ISP was the same as "Program to an interface, not an implementation". But it looks like these are different principles?

Is there a difference?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

ISP is focused on the idea of each interface representing one discrete and cohesive behavior.

That is, each logical group of things an object should do would map to a single specific interface. A class might want to do several things, but each thing would map to a specific interface representing that behavior. The idea is each interface is very focused.

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1  
short and to the point –  Gordon Feb 12 '12 at 15:15
1  
wow .. thanks! cant accept for another 5 minutes :) –  hangar18 Feb 12 '12 at 15:19
3  
+1. The classic "smell" that tells you you're not following this principle is a client consuming (depending on) an interface where the client only calls a subset of the interface's methods. –  TrueWill Feb 12 '12 at 18:36

Here's a real-world example of this principle (in PHP)

Problem Statement:

I want various forms of content to have comments/discussion associated with them. That content might be anything from a forum topic, to a news article, to a user's profile, to a conversation-style private message.

Architecture

We will want a re-usable DiscussionManager class which attaches a Discussion to a given content entity. However, the above four examples (and many more) are all conceptually different. If we want the DiscussionManager to use them, then all four+ need to have one common interface that they all share. There is no other way for DiscussionManager to use them unless you want to your arguments to go naked (e.g. no type checking).

Solution: Discussable interface with these methods:

  • attachDiscussion($topic_id)
  • detachDiscussion()
  • getDiscussionID()

Then DiscussionManager might look like this:

class DiscussionManager
{
    public function addDiscussionToContent(Discussable $Content)
    {
        $Discussion = $this->DiscussionFactory->make( ...some data...);
        $Discussion->save() // Or $this->DiscussionRepository->save($Discussion);
        $Content->attachDiscussion($Discussion->getID()); // Maybe saves itself, or you can save through a repository
    }

    public function deleteDiscussion(Discussable $Content)
    {
        $id = $Content->getDiscussionID();
        $Content->detatchDiscussion();
        $this->DiscussionRepository->delete($id);
    }

    public function closeDiscussion($discussion_id) { ... }
}

This way, DiscussionManager does not care about any of the unrelated behaviors of the various content types that it uses. It ONLY cares about the behaviors it needs, regardless of what those behaviors are associated with. So by giving each content type that you want to have discussions for, a Discussable interface, you are using the interface segregation principle.

This is also a good example of a situation where an abstract base class is not a good idea. A forum topic, user profile, and news article aren't even remotely conceptually the same thing, thus trying to get them to inherit the discussion behaviors leads to strange coupling to an unrelated parent. Using a specific interface that represents discussions, you can makes sure that the entities you want to have discussions, are compatible with the client code that will be managing those discussions.

This example might also be a good candidate for usage of Traits in PHP, for what it's worth.

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Agree with both the answers above. Just to give an example of TrueWill's code smell above, you shouldn't find yourself doing this:

@Override
public void foo() {
    //Not used: just needed to implement interface
}
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Compare with Java API classes that just throw a NotImplementedException, especially in collections. Used in moderation this could be useful for partially-used methods in an interface, though extending Map with MutableMap, for instance, could have been the alternative. –  hexafraction Sep 30 '13 at 0:18

Robert Martin has a very good explanation of Interface segregation principle (ISP), in his book "UML for Java Programmers". Based on that, I don't think ISP is about an interface being "focused" on one logical, coherent group of things. Because, that goes without saying; or, at least it should go without saying. Each class, interface or abstract class should be designed that way.

So, what is ISP? Let me explain it with an example. Say, you have a class A and a class B, which is the client of class A. Suppose, class A has ten methods, of which only two are used by B. Now, does B need to know about all ten methods of A? Probably not - the principle of Information hiding. The more you expose, the more you create the chance for coupling. For that reason, you may insert an interface, call it C, between the two classes (segregation). That interface will only declare the two methods that are used by B, and B will depend on that Interface, instead of directly on A.

So now,

class A {
   method1()
   method2()
   // more methods
   method10()
}
class B {
    A a = new A()

}

will become

interface C {
      method1()
       method2()
}



class A implements C{
      method1()
      method2()
      // more methods
      method10()
  }
  class B {
       C c = new A()

 }   

This, prevents B from knowing more than it should.

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+1 for the taking the time out for a detailed explanation! –  hangar18 Feb 13 '12 at 14:04
    
Excellent answer! –  Adam Arold Jul 23 '12 at 17:26
    
I think @Pete Stensønes explanation is more general and precise, than what I have done. I suggest people to pay more attention to his definition. Mine, though not necessarily wrong, explains the concept in terms of one use case of it, missing its general point. –  Nazar Merza Dec 24 '12 at 17:01
    
I don't fully understand this argument that the client should be prevented from having the knowledge about the other methods. With Java ,when it does not use those methods, obviously it will not have any impact when those not-used methods change. –  Ganesh Kumar Feb 14 at 9:51
    
@GaneshKumar Please read my comment, just above your comment. –  Nazar Merza Feb 14 at 14:50

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