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I want to convert

console.log({
  a: 'a'
}, {
  b: 'b'
});

into CoffeeScript. The only way I found is

console.log
  a: 'a',
    b: 'b'

It seems bizarre that a: 'a' and b: 'b' are not indented the same when they are essentially symetric in this situation.

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Just because you can leave off braces/parens in coffeescript, it doesn't mean you should. This is probably one of the "shouldn't" cases. –  Aaron Dufour Feb 12 '12 at 23:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Or you could use braces, which do work in CS:

console.log {a:'a'}, {b:'b'}
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1  
Right, braces and parentheses are (usually) optional but there's no reason for contortions to avoid them. –  mu is too short Feb 12 '12 at 18:05

Put the comma one in a separated line, one indentation level less than the hash/object, so it's treated as part of the function invocation.

console.log
   a: 'a'
, # indentation level matters!
   b: 'b'

this will not work because the indentation level is the same as hash, so it's treated as part of the hash.

console.log
   a: 'a'
   ,
   b: 'b'
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$ coffee -bce 'console.log(a: "a"; b: "b")'
// Generated by CoffeeScript 1.2.1-pre

console.log({
  a: "a"
}, {
  b: "b"
});
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i'm sorry, what is your point here –  Randomblue Feb 13 '12 at 11:57
    
Just showing another way to represent your JS. –  matyr Feb 13 '12 at 18:42

Well, if you think about the parsing rules,

a: 'a',
b: 'b'

actually means

{ a: 'a', b: 'b' }

Since this isn't the behaviour you want, you need to tell the parser that the line with b: is another object. Indenting will do that for you. Now this wasn't really a question, but I hope it helps you understand why to do it the way you described. It is the right way.

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