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First off I apologize if there is another post out there that answers this, all the similar posts I found dealt with diamond inheritance schemes or defined functions, which this does not.

In short, I'm wondering if it is possible to have one class inherit from two other classes where both child classes has a function with the same name and arguments but it is defined in one child class, and pure-virtual in another. Furthermore if I can do this, would invoking the function on the pure-virtual/abstract class end up calling the defined function on the other child class with minimal changes to the derived class?

Example:

class A
{
    public:
    virtual void Set(int X) = 0;
};

class B
{
    public:
    virtual void Set(int X);
};

class AB : public A, public B
{
    //other methods not relevant to example go here
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int Y = 5;
    A* ObjectA = new AB();
    ObjectA->Set(Y);
    return 0;
}

So far my attempts to compile this basic example have been met with errors that say:

'AB' : cannot instantiate abstract class due to following members: 'void A::Set(int)' : is abstract

When doing my own research I couldn't find a clear answer, but based on other questions that dealt with related topics I found that using a "using B::Set" in class AB may help with this. But when I try adding it to the AB class definition, the error persists.

Is there any way I can make this work?

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2  
There's missing a virtual in the fourth line. –  Karl von Moor Feb 12 '12 at 18:05
    
Your code is missing at least onevirtual specifier. Please fix. –  n.m. Feb 12 '12 at 18:07
    
And now we know why many langauges don't implement MI, because people like you just have to do something like this. :) :) –  Tony Hopkinson Feb 12 '12 at 18:12
    
@TonyHopkinson: The question has nothing to do with MI. The asker is just confused about pure-virtual functions. –  Kerrek SB Feb 12 '12 at 18:15
    
Fixed the virtual thing. >.> –  Mako_Energy Feb 12 '12 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you tried implementing the method:

class AB : public A, public B
{
    void Set(int X) {}
};

The reason it's not working is that A::Set() is pure virtual. I.e. it has no implementation. But you try to call it. You have to override it in the derived class in order to be able to instantiate the derived class.

The using doesn't work in your case because you have an A*, so there's no ambiguity for the compiler.

In case you had:

AB* ObjectA = new AB();
ObjectA->Set(Y);

you'd have to use using inside the declaration of AB to resolve the ambiguity.

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The thought to do this had occurred to me, yes. However I was hoping for a more lean solution as I want to minimize the code involved in integrating the abstract class with other classes. The "AB" and "B" classes in this case can be a number of different classes in my application. Never-the-less, if it's what I have to do, it's what I have to do. I'll accept this as the answer if a leaner one doesn't come along soon. Thanks. –  Mako_Energy Feb 12 '12 at 18:24
    
@Mako_Energy there will be no correct answer that tells you how to instantiate an abstract class. Since you don't override a base abstract method, your class is abstract. There's no going around that. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 12 '12 at 18:29

If you had 2 normal functions Set in A and B, then using B::Set would tell the compiler that if you have object of class AB and call method Set of that object, B::Set will be invoked, if AB::Set not defined explicitly.

Your situation is different. You have pure virtual function A::Set that leads A to be abstract class. As AB does not override A::Set, AB becomes abstract too, that is why you cannot instantiate it.

What you can do here

You can implement AB::set to call B::Set:

class AB : public A, public B
{
public:
    void Set(int x) { return B::Set(x); }
};

Also I do not recommend same method names for base classes, as I do not recommend multiple inheritance, try use aggregation instead.

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Class AB derives from A, A has a pure virtual method making the class abstract, AB must implement any pure virtual methods declared in a base class in order to be instantiated.

I would try to avoid multiple inheritance it can cause many headaches and there are generally better ways to solve a problem, for instance in this example I don't understand the point in deriving from both A and B, if B shares and in fact implements the same interface as A then surely B should be derived from A.

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