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Is there a way to check slices/maps for the presence of a value?

I would like to add a value to a slice only if it does not exist in the slice.

This works, but it seems verbose. Is there a beter way to do this?

orgSlice := []int{1, 2, 3}
newSlice := []int{}
newInt := 2

newSlice = append(newSlice, newInt)
for _, v := range orgSlice {
    if v != newInt {
        newSlice = append(newSlice, v)
    }
}

newSlice == [2 1 3]

EDIT: tux21b posted a nice solution for when the values are int, but I also need something that works when values are string

orgSlice := []string{"a", "b", "c"}

EDIT2: As stated by jnml this solution works for strings as well.

Final question: I realize that using a struct in this situation will be most efficient, but for storage purposes I must convert it to a slice:

Does this requirement require me to loop over the map? E.g.:

set := make(map[int]struct{})
set[1] = struct{}{}
set[2] = struct{}{}
set[1] = struct{}{}
// ...

newSlice := []int{}
for key := range(set) {
  newSlice := append(newSlice, key)

fmt.Println(newSlice)

Or are there better options now that the keys are unique?

share|improve this question
1  
Re:EDIT - it's the same story for any valid map key type - which string is. –  zzzz Feb 12 '12 at 19:01
1  
Re:EDIT2 - if the order of values in 'newSlice' doesn't matter AND it will be used/consumed using a range statement then its construction is redundant - just range the keys of 'set'. –  zzzz Feb 12 '12 at 20:09
    
@jnml Thanks for your comments. I'm storing the list of ints in GAE datastore and for the purpose of querying it must be a slice ( []int ). Does that requirement makes my initial technique the better choice? The lists will be small. –  Kyle Finley Feb 12 '12 at 20:32
2  
You can avoid the usage of append() (and all the reallocations) by creating creating a newslice := make([]int, len(set)) in the first place. If you do a lot of such "contains the key ..." tests (at least more than 2), converting the slice to a map[int]struct{} will be probably much faster, if you do just a few, looping through the slice directly is probably better. –  tux21b Feb 12 '12 at 21:08
    
@tux21b Ok, thank you, I really appreciate you taking the time to explain all of this. –  Kyle Finley Feb 12 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Most efficient is likely to be iterating over the slice and appending if you don't find it.

func AppendIfMissing(slice []int, i int) []int {
    for _, ele := range slice {
        if ele == i {
            return slice
        }
    }
    return append(slice, i)
}

It's simple and obvious and will be fast for small lists.

Further, it will always be faster than your current map-based solution. The map-based solution iterates over the whole slice no matter what; this solution returns immediately when it finds that the new value is already present. Both solutions compare elements as they iterate. (Each map assignment statement certainly does at least one map key comparison internally.) A map would only be useful if you could maintain it across many insertions. If you rebuild it on every insertion, then all advantage is lost.

If you truly need to efficiently handle large lists, consider maintaining the lists in sorted order. (I suspect the order doesn't matter to you because your first solution appended at the beginning of the list and your latest solution appends at the end.) If you always keep the lists sorted then you you can use the sort.Search function to do efficient binary insertions.

share|improve this answer

Your approach would take linear time for each insertion. A better way would be to use a map[int]struct{}. Alternatively, you could also use a map[int]bool or something similar, but the empty struct{} has the advantage that it doesn't occupy any additional space. Therefore map[int]struct{} is a popular choice for a set of integers.

Example:

set := make(map[int]struct{})
set[1] = struct{}{}
set[2] = struct{}{}
set[1] = struct{}{}
// ...

for key := range(set) {
  fmt.Println(key)
}
// each value will be printed only once, in no particular order


// you can use the ,ok idiom to check for existing keys
if _, ok := set[1]; ok {
  fmt.Println("element found")
} else {
  fmt.Println("element not found")
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. A couple questions: How would you then recreate the slice? Is there a way to make this strategy work with strings? Sorry if these are obvious - I'm new to Go. –  Kyle Finley Feb 12 '12 at 18:57
2  
I would use just the map during the computation (because it has an O(1) behavior instead of O(n)). After that, you can create a slice and copy each value from the map. The elements will have a random order after that, so you might want to sort it. And you can use int, float, struct, string, and arrays as map keys (at least in Go1). –  tux21b Feb 12 '12 at 19:50
    
For storage purposes the value must be []init{} (GAE: queryable repeated properties). Does that additional requirement make the original technique more attractive for small lists? Or is still better to convert the list to a map and then back again? –  Kyle Finley Feb 12 '12 at 21:04

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