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I'm working on a C++ project.

I had a class with its function, then I realized some of those functions weren't related to that class but were just math functions so I decided to move them on to a namespace.

My first question is, what is the appropriate file extension for a c++ namespace?

I have a constants.h file where I plan on saving global constants, for example PI.

Right now:

#include <math.h>
const double PI = M_PI;

I have the namespace I talked about before, right now is called: specificMath.h

#include <stdlib.h>
#include "constants.h"
... more code

I have a gaussian.cpp:

#include "gaussian.h"
#include "specificMath.h"
#include <iostream>
... more code

This file includes a main function that right now does nothing, I just can't get the whole project to compile without a main...

I have a gaussian.h where I'm not including anything, is that wrong?

A third class, which has no attributes, just methods (again, is this wrong? or not pretty?). truncatedFunctions.cpp

#include "specificMath.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "truncatedFunctions.h"
#include "gaussian.h"

using namespace specificMath;

And its truncatedFunctions.h where, again, I'm not including anything.

And a fourth class where I include

#include "margin.h" //Its header, where I'm not including anything
#include "gaussian.h"
#include "specificMath.h"

using namespace specificMath;

When I "make" it, it seems to compile fine, but when it gets to the linking part I get A LOT of errors saying that things on my margin.cpp class were first defined in truncatedFunctions.cpp

I am going crazy. I have no idea why this is happening, or how to solve it. I would really appreciate if somebody could help me out, and please, any extra piece of advice would be great since I am really trying to learn as much as I can with this project. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When I "make" it, it seems to compile fine, but when it gets to the linking part I get A LOT of errors saying that things on my margin.cpp class were first defined in truncatedFunctions.cpp

Did you define your functions in your specificMath.h? You should only declare those functions.

For example, if your specificMath.h contains function definitions like

#ifndef COOL_STUFF_NSPC
#define COOL_STUFF_NSPC
#include <iostream>
namespace coolstuff{
    void print(void){std::cout << "I'm declared in a header file." << std::endl;
}
#endif

and you are using including this file in several others, the linker is going crazy. Including means copying. And so you've got yourself coolstuff::print defined several times. The better way (and the only possible way when using self-written functions in many files) is splitting your code into a header and implementation as you did in gaussian.

// coolstuff.namepace.h
#ifndef COOL_STUFF_NSPC
#define COOL_STUFF_NSPC
namespace coolstuff{
    void print(void);
}
#endif

When you include coolstuff.namespace.h it will only declare functions. And you can declare the same function several times.

// coolstuff.namespace.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include "cs.h"

void coolstuff::print(void){
    std::cout << "Hello world!" << std::endl;
}

The .cpp file contains the implementation of your functions. Now your linker won't get irritated because there is only one implementation of coolstuff::print and not n (where n is the number of #include "cs.namespace.h" you used) ones.

My first question is, what is the appropriate file extension for a c++ namespace?

There is no standard namespace extension. Use .h/.cpp for header/implementation and a self-defined prefix, something like 'nmspc' or 'nsc'. It's up to you.

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It's hard to tell whether you've done anything wrong in your code (because you didn't show any of it), but the first thing to try is to "clean" your build and rebuild all your code. If the compiler (don't know what you're using) for some reason didn't compile all your modified modules, then it's not surprising that the linker is having trouble.

My first question is, what is the appropriate file extension for a c++ namespace?

In C++, header files are usually .h or .hpp. It doesn't matter to the compiler.

#include "gaussian.h"
#include "specificMath.h"
#include <iostream>

In general, it's a good idea to #include stuff from the standard library first, followed by your own things.

I have a gaussian.h where I'm not including anything, is that wrong?

No. If you don't need to include anything, don't include anything.

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First, use include guards for the headers.

#ifndef MYHEADER_H
#define MYHEADER_H

//header contents

#endif

This will prevent the same header from being included twice in the same translation unit.

Second, don't define uncosnt stuff in the headers:

double x = 0;

this will cause all translation units to export that symbol.

Declare the variable extern in your header and provide a definition for it in an implementation file.

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There's nothing wrong with const scalar declarations in header files in C++; there's no need to use the clumsy extern for that. In fact, using extern can cause the compiler to miss out on optimisations it could otherwise do knowing the actual data value. –  Greg Hewgill Feb 12 '12 at 18:23
    
@GregHewgill I didn't know that, thanks. I edited, maybe he has non-const variables somewhere in the headers. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 12 '12 at 18:26
    
With header you mean the includes, right? –  coconut Feb 12 '12 at 18:34
    
@coconut yes[...] –  Luchian Grigore Feb 12 '12 at 18:35

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