Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have simple collection of string objects might be around 10 elements , but i use this collection in production environment such that the we search for a given string in that collection millions of tiimes , what is the best collection or data structure we can use to get the best results so that seach operation can be performed in 0(1) time we can use HashMap here but the order of search there is in constant time not 0(1) i want to make sure that search is 0(1).

Our data structure must return true if present , else false if not present

share|improve this question
    
Constant time search? Yeah, a HashMap is probably your best bet. –  Etienne de Martel Feb 12 '12 at 18:31
2  
Please ask separate questions separately. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 12 '12 at 18:38
    
You should bencmark different solutions. A HashSet or similar is probably a good choice, but don't underestimate the speed of simple array searches when you have small collections. The overhead of generating a hashcode, looking up the hashcode and finding the correct bucket will also take time. A simple for-loop in an array of only 10 elements could potentially be a better choice, even if it's not constant. –  Optimist Feb 12 '12 at 20:45
add comment

3 Answers

Constant time is O(1). HashMap is fine. (Or HashSet, depending on whether you need a Set or a Map.)

If your set is immutable, Guava's ImmutableSet will reduce memory footprint by a factor of ~3 (and probably give you a small constant factor of improved speed).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah i can use HashSet HashMap as well , but we are in the process whether we should go with third party available libraries . Like Google Guava and Trove . Will using a Identity HashMap Help ? as using third party apis is tough call unless its worth . How far these Gauva and Trove APIs are used in industry –  codeninja Feb 12 '12 at 20:41
    
IdentityHashMap will almost certainly hurt you rather than helping you. Guava is pretty extensively used; in particular, it's basically used in all Java-based Google services in production. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 13 '12 at 1:49
add comment

If you can't use HashSet/HashMap as previously suggested, you could write a Radix Tree implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah i can use HashSet HashMap as well , but we are in the process whether we should go with third party available libraries . Like Google Guava and Trove . Will using a Identity HashMap Help ? as using third party apis is tough call unless its worth . How far these Gauva and Trove APIs are used in industry –  codeninja Feb 12 '12 at 20:41
add comment

Use a HashSet<String> structure. The contains() operation has a complexity of O(1).

share|improve this answer
    
HashSet<String> does it ensure it gives 0(1) search complexity if so thats good . we will use it then –  codeninja Feb 12 '12 at 18:40
    
No it doesn't. Only if the hash codes of your objects are properly distributed. Therefore it's more something between O(n) and O(1), depending on the actual data and its implementation of hashCode(). But as said before, Hash(Map|Set) may be your best bet though. –  the-banana-king Feb 12 '12 at 18:56
    
Yeah i understand we cannot guarantee that its 0(1) its 0(c) time mostly . But can i design any custom data structure such that its gives in 0(1) . does guava collection set from google help like using a immutable collection ? does it help to reduce the memory foot print at least . since we use in a gaming industry per message if we can achieve it it would be a huge performance gain –  codeninja Feb 12 '12 at 19:07
    
ImmutableSet from Guava will definitely reduce the memory footprint (as compared to HashSet), and probably speed things up by a small constant factor. Depending on a) the length of your strings, b) how often you get the same query more than once, c) whether or not you're willing to pay increased memory overhead, it might be worthwhile to implement a trie. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 12 '12 at 20:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.