Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently tried to create a property for a Vector2 field, just to realize that it doesn't work as intended.

public Vector2 Position { get; set; }

this prevents me from changing the values of its members (X & Y)

Looking up information on this, I read that creating a property to a Vector2 struct returns only a copy of the original object and not a reference.

As a Java developer this confuses me.

When are objects in C# passed by value and when are they passed by reference?
Are all struct objects passed by value?

share|improve this question
1  
You need to show more. This should work as you expect it to. –  Captain Giraffe Feb 12 '12 at 18:53
3  
a struct is a value type - so it is passed by value - for each reference type on the other hand (i.e. class) by default a copy of the reference is passed (the reference itself is passed by value) –  BrokenGlass Feb 12 '12 at 18:54
4  
@b1naryj the stack vs heap part is an implementation detail that is almost always an unhelpful way of thinking about it. –  phoog Feb 12 '12 at 19:05
    
@b1naryj Nobody misses that because it doesn’t exist: class Foo { Vector2 x; } – now the struct value x is allocated on the heap, not on the stack. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '12 at 19:08
9  
Structs are passed by value. As you have discovered, making a mutable struct is a "worst practice" because doing so is so confusing. Make structs immutable values, just like integers are immutable values. –  Eric Lippert Feb 12 '12 at 19:50

8 Answers 8

up vote 30 down vote accepted

It is important to realise that everything in C# is passed by value, unless you specify ref or out in the signature.

What makes value types (and hence structs) different from reference types is that a value type is accessed directly, while a reference type is accessed via its reference. If you pass a reference type into a method, its reference, not the value itself, is passed by value.

share|improve this answer
3  
While this is (technically) correct, I feel that it's a confusing answer. C# (and .NET in general) chose the Value Type vs. Reference Type abstraction. Deconstructing that abstraction might be technically true, but in practice it's not productive. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Feb 12 '12 at 18:59
19  
@Avner Sorry but you are incorrect. The distinction is crucial because otherwise you end up with a flawed understanding and faulty code. If you though that references were passed by reference (and many programmers do!) you will expect that modifications to the reference in the method are visible to the caller (and again, many programmers do expect that). So my answer isn’t only technically true, it’s of practical relevance (and thus productive). Paraphrasing Feynman: if reality is too confusing for you, that’s just too bad, choose a different reality. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '12 at 19:04
1  
If a parameter of a reference type is passed by reference, then assigning a new object to the parameter variable will alter the original variable of the caller. If, however, it is passed by value, this will not affect the original value. It is very important to makes this distinction. Reference types and value types can both be passed by reference or by value. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 12 '12 at 20:15
4  
@Jonathan Just as an aside, Microsoft sucks at terminology. Ignore them, they are huge trolls. As for an example where the distinction matters, there are enough questions on SO where this tripped somebody up. It should be easy to see that the distinction is helpful. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '12 at 21:04
5  
@JonathanWood: The value of a string object is of course the text, but the value of a string variable is the reference to the string object. The term passing by reference is when you use the ref keyword, and it's only confusiong if you use it when you actually mean passing a reference. –  Guffa Feb 13 '12 at 7:29

A struct is a value type, so it's always passed as a value.

A value can either be a reference type (object) or a value type (struct). What's passed around is always a value; for a reference type you pass the value of the reference to it, for a value type you pass the value itself.

The term by reference is used when you use the ref or out keywords to pass a parameter. Then you are passing a reference to the variable that contains the value instead of passing the value. Normally a parameter is always passed by value.

share|improve this answer
    
So, there is no easy way to implement properties with a struct? –  Acidic Feb 12 '12 at 19:11
    
@Acidic: Yes. If you need to set the properties individually of a struct property, then it should most likely not be a struct anyway. –  Guffa Feb 12 '12 at 20:10
    
@Acidic: it is easy, but from a java perspective, not what you want. In the .NET world, structs are supposed to be immutable, so you should not allow for the the change of individual properties. The language supports changing individual properties, but since everything is passed by value, you always change the property on a copy of the struct, not the original (unless you use the ref or out keyword, but that would create really awkward code for changing the properties mutable structs). –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Feb 13 '12 at 7:02

.NET data types are divided into value and reference types. Value types include int, byte, and structs. Reference types include string and classes.

structs are appropriate instead of classes when they just contain one or two value types (although even there you can have unintended side effects).

So structs are indeed passed by value and what you are seeing is expected.

share|improve this answer

Objects are passed by reference and structs by value. But note that you have the "out" and "ref" modifiers on arguments.

So you can pass a struct by reference like so:

public void fooBar( ref Vector2 position )
{
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, structs inherit from ValueType, and are passed by value. This is true for primitive types as well - int, double, bool, etc (but not string). Strings, arrays and all classes are reference types, and are passed by reference.

If you want to pass a struct by ref, using the ref keyword:

public void MyMethod (ref Vector2 position)

which will pass the struct by-ref, and allow you to modify its members.

share|improve this answer
1  
You will only be able to modify its members if it is mutable. Mutable structs are generally discouraged. Furthermore, it is not possible to pass a property by reference. –  phoog Feb 12 '12 at 19:02
    
That's true, but note the actual question in the OP: what is passed by ref, what is passed by val. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Feb 12 '12 at 19:04
1  
@supercat, that is not modifying a member of the struct, that's assigning a new value to the (entire) struct. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 5:15
1  
@supercat what if the struct has 2 members of 16 bits each? Then the write is atomic, and what you say couldn't happen. Non-atomic writes do not imply mutability. Put another way: you are describing a threading scenario in which a thread reads a value in an invalid state, and claiming that it is mutation of an immutable struct. It's not mutation, it's logically invalid data. What if it were a 64-bit integer? The analogous error could happen; does that make Int64 mutable? No, it makes it non-atomic. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 14:48
1  
@supercat Nothing is immutable except ROM if you want to look at it that way. If you go outside the type system with BlockCopy to modify data, that doesn't tell you anything about how data behaves within the type system. How do you propose that KeyValuePair<Int16, Int16> would allow a thread to read (1, 4) when another thread is overwriting (1, 2) with (3, 4)? The write is atomic! –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 18:50

The problem is, that the getter returns a copy of Vector2. If you change the coordinates like this

obj.Position.X = x;
obj.Position.Y = y;

You only change the coordinates of this ephemeral copy.

Do this instead

obj.Position = new Vector2(x, y);

This has nothing to do with by value or by reference. Value2 is a value type and get returns this value. If the vector was a reference type (class), get would return this reference. Return values are always returned by value. Even if the values are references, these references are returned by value.

share|improve this answer
6  
Of course it is an object. Why would you suppose that an instance of a struct is not an object? –  Eric Lippert Feb 12 '12 at 19:51
5  
@Acidic: If you are changing the value of the field then change the value of the field! Vectors are logically immutable, just like integers. You don't think "I'm going to change the number 12 so that it is now 13". You think "I'm going to replace the integer stored in this variable, 12, with a new integer, 13." Don't think "I'm going to mutate (1,2) to (1,3)". Think "I'm going to replace the vector in this variable, (1,2) with a different vector (1,3)." Think about values as values. –  Eric Lippert Feb 12 '12 at 19:54
3  
If it pleases you to believe the falsehood that structs are not objects, you go ahead and have that pleasant belief. I recommend against teaching that falsehood to others though; it seems likely to confuse them. –  Eric Lippert Feb 12 '12 at 19:57
6  
@supercat: storage locations of value types hold values. Values of value type are objects. This idea that you have that there is a "corresponding class type" is very Java-ish, and is a pleasant fiction, but it is a fiction. If you and Olivier enjoy believing this pleasant fiction, that's fine with me, but I'd find it unfortunate that you'd want to teach it to others. The implementation details of how a value is laid out in memory have nothing whatsoever to do with whether a thing is an "object" or not. –  Eric Lippert Feb 13 '12 at 2:17
5  
@supercat: That is absolutely not the definition of "inheritance" in C#. And so phoog is correct -- if you start with a completely different definition, then you're going to arrive at completely different conclusions. You are free to use any definition you like, but again, when you teach it to other people, you're just impeding their ability to communicate with people who have already agreed to use the definition in the specification. –  Eric Lippert Feb 13 '12 at 14:45

Just to illustrate the different effects of passing struct vs class through methods:

(note: tested in LINQPad 4)

Example

/// via http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9251608/are-structs-pass-by-value
void Main() {

    // just confirming with delegates
    Action<StructTransport> delegateTryUpdateValueType = (t) => {
        t.i += 10;
        t.s += ", appended delegate";
    };

    Action<ClassTransport> delegateTryUpdateRefType = (t) => {
        t.i += 10;
        t.s += ", appended delegate";
    };

    // initial state
    var structObject = new StructTransport { i = 1, s = "one" };
    var classObject = new ClassTransport { i = 2, s = "two" };

    structObject.Dump("Value Type - initial");
    classObject.Dump("Reference Type - initial");

    // make some changes!
    delegateTryUpdateValueType(structObject);
    delegateTryUpdateRefType(classObject);

    structObject.Dump("Value Type - after delegate");
    classObject.Dump("Reference Type - after delegate");

    methodTryUpdateValueType(structObject);
    methodTryUpdateRefType(classObject);

    structObject.Dump("Value Type - after method");
    classObject.Dump("Reference Type - after method");

    methodTryUpdateValueTypePassByRef(ref structObject);
    methodTryUpdateRefTypePassByRef(ref classObject);

    structObject.Dump("Value Type - after method passed-by-ref");
    classObject.Dump("Reference Type - after method passed-by-ref");
}

// the constructs
public struct StructTransport {
    public int i { get; set; }
    public string s { get; set; }
}
public class ClassTransport {
    public int i { get; set; }
    public string s { get; set; }
}

// the methods
public void methodTryUpdateValueType(StructTransport t) {
    t.i += 100;
    t.s += ", appended method";
}

public void methodTryUpdateRefType(ClassTransport t) {
    t.i += 100;
    t.s += ", appended method";
}

public void methodTryUpdateValueTypePassByRef(ref StructTransport t) {
    t.i += 1000;
    t.s += ", appended method by ref";
}

public void methodTryUpdateRefTypePassByRef(ref ClassTransport t) {
    t.i += 1000;
    t.s += ", appended method by ref";
}

Results

(from LINQPad Dump)

Value Type - initial 
StructTransport 
UserQuery+StructTransport 
i 1 
s one 


Reference Type - initial 
ClassTransport 
UserQuery+ClassTransport 
i 2 
s two 

//------------------------

Value Type - after delegate 
StructTransport 
UserQuery+StructTransport 
i 1 
s one 


Reference Type - after delegate 
ClassTransport 
UserQuery+ClassTransport 
i 12 
s two, appended delegate 

//------------------------

Value Type - after method 
StructTransport 
UserQuery+StructTransport 
i 1 
s one 


Reference Type - after method 
ClassTransport 
UserQuery+ClassTransport 
i 112 
s two, appended delegate, appended method 

//------------------------

Value Type - after method passed-by-ref 
StructTransport 
UserQuery+StructTransport 
i 1001 
s one, appended method by ref 


Reference Type - after method passed-by-ref 
ClassTransport 
UserQuery+ClassTransport 
i 1112 
s two, appended delegate, appended method, appended method by ref 
share|improve this answer

Every storage location of a structure type holds all the fields, private and public, of that struct. Passing a parameter of a structure type entails allocating space for that structure on the stack and copying all of the fields from the structure to the stack.

With regard to working with structures stored within a collection, using mutable structs with the existing collections generally requires reading out a struct to a local copy, mutating that copy, and the storing it back. Assuming MyList is a List<Point>, and one wants to add some local variable z to MyList[3].X:

  Point temp = MyList[3];
  temp.X += Z;
  MyList[3] = temp;

This is mildly annoying, but is often cleaner, safer, and more efficient than using immutable structs, way more efficient than immutable class objects, and way safer than using mutable class objects. I'd really like to see compiler support for a better way for collections to expose value-type elements. There are ways of writing efficient code to handle such exposure with good semantics (e.g. a collection object could react when elements were updated, without requiring those elements to have any link to the collection) but the code reads horribly. Adding compiler support in a manner conceptually similar to closures would allow efficient code to also be readable.

Note that contrary to what some people claim, a structure is fundamentally different from a class-type object, but for every structure type there is a corresponding type, sometimes referred to as a "boxed structure", which derives from Object (see the CLI (Common Language Infrastructure) specification, sections 8.2.4 and 8.9.7). Although the compiler will implicitly convert any struct into its corresponding boxed type when necessary to pass it to code that expects a reference to a class-type object, will allow references to boxed structs to have their contents copied into real structs, and will sometimes allow code to work with boxed structs directly, boxed structs behave like class objects, because that's what they are.

share|improve this answer
    
As Eric Lippert has pointed out, your terminology is not standard (e.g. "object type" should be "reference type"). In addition, in the context of C# (as opposed to .NET in general), you really don't ever need to think about boxed types. Values of value type undergo a boxing conversion if they are stored in variables of reference type (e.g. System.ValueType, System.Enum, or System.Object), but the fact that this involves a transient boxed type when it comes to the IL type system is an irrelevant implementation detail when it comes to understanding the behavior of C# code. –  kvb Feb 13 '12 at 15:39
    
@kvb while it may not be necessary to think about the implementation details of boxed types, you do need to think somewhat about their semantics. You wouldn't be able to teach c# programming without introducing the concept of boxed types, for example. How else would you explain that (short)(object)1 throws an InvalidCastException? –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 16:18
    
In this example, you don't even need the concept of boxing, not to mention boxed types, to describe what's going on. (short)(object)1 throws an exception because (object)1 is an object containing a value of runtime type int, not a value of runtime type short. This is analogous to why (short)(object)"test", or (string)(object)1, or (System.Attribute)(object)"test" throw exceptions. Boxing doesn't really have anything to do with this behavior. –  kvb Feb 13 '12 at 17:16
    
In general, the concept of boxing (i.e. storing a value of value type in a storage location of reference type) is most relevant when explaining the behavior of mutable structs. Boxed types (i.e. the IL verification types that correspond to each value type), on the other hand, are really never needed to describe how C# works. The fact that the verifier knows that int is boxed to a boxed int on route to being stored as an object is an irrelevant implementation detail. –  kvb Feb 13 '12 at 17:27
    
The terminology gets tricky here, because I think it's accurate to say that (object)1 is a boxed int (that is, an int value which has been boxed). However, it's not accurate to say that it's an instance of type boxed int; it's an instance of type object. The boxed types never appear as storage locations, so they really don't come into play at the C# level. –  kvb Feb 13 '12 at 17:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.