Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is a decent way to handle PDO error when using try catch block?

Currently I have something like this:

BlogModel.php

   class BlogModel extends Model {
       public function save($id, $value) {
         $stmt = $this->getDb()->prepare('UPDATE setting SET name = :name WHERE id = :id');
         $stmt->bindParam(':id', $id);
         $stmt->bindParam(':name', $values);
         return ($stmt->execute() !== false) ? $id : false;
       }
   }

So, in the controller BlogController.php, I would do something like this:

<?php
class Blog extends Controller {

    public function comments()
    {
        $data = array();
        $model = new BlogModel;

        if ($model->save(2,'test')) {
                $data['result']['message'] = 'Settings saved';
                $data['result']['status'] = 'success';
        } else {
                $data['result']['message'] = 'Could not save the settings';
                $data['result']['status'] = 'error';
        }

        $view = new View("view.php", $data)
        $view->render();
    }
}
?>

This is the way I handle PDO error using if conditions. What is the decent way to translate this into try catch block? I don't want to code the variables ($data['result']['message'] $data['result']['status']) all the time.

Is possible to add "throw exception" in the catch block somehow?

If there is a lot of try catch blocks in the controller, it going to look messy.. right?

share|improve this question
    
Just curious: Is this CakePHP? I can't tell. –  Chris Laplante Feb 12 '12 at 20:14
1  
@SimpleCoder my own MVC I have written ;) –  I'll-Be-Back Feb 12 '12 at 20:14
    
Oh, neat. I guess the direct use of PDO should have given that away, as opposed to Cake's db interface. –  Chris Laplante Feb 12 '12 at 20:16
    
You may find this page of the PHP docs useful php.net/manual/en/class.pdoexception.php –  Relequestual Feb 12 '12 at 20:34
    
Have a look at the example here. You can cut out all the useless html but you get the gist... –  Basic Feb 12 '12 at 20:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

None of the answers here are wrong. But actually all three combined are the real answer. You should definitely set

$this->pdo->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

as said by Cerad.

From now on every single issue about anything regarding database is thrown via exception of type PDOException. You just don't have to throw your own Exception as said by ladar because it's useless. Just take the ladar code and convert it into

 ...
 $data = array();
 $model = new BlogModel;

    try{
      $model->save(2,'test');
      $data['result']['message'] = 'Settings saved';
      $data['result']['status'] = 'success';
    }catch(PDOException $e){
        $data['result']['message'] = 'Could not save the settings';
        $data['result']['status'] = 'error';
    }

And do NOT throw anything by yourself.

Then a very nice way for debugging PDO queries is using the catch script linked by Basic that you can find here once again.

Combining this things togheter you'll have a flexible, clean and easy-debug way to catch all the errors that could come.

share|improve this answer

What about:

class BlogModel extends Model {
   public function save($id, $value) {
   ...
   if (!$stmt->execute()) {
        throw new Exception($stmt->errorInfo());
    }
   return $id;

And then

 ...
 $data = array();
 $model = new BlogModel;

    try{
      $model->save(2,'test');
      $data['result']['message'] = 'Settings saved';
      $data['result']['status'] = 'success';
    }catch(Exception $e){
        $data['result']['message'] = 'Could not save the settings';
        $data['result']['status'] = 'error';
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for actually showing an example and not just providing a link to something else –  cspray Feb 12 '12 at 21:39
    
Not a bad example, thanks.. Is there alternative way to that? –  I'll-Be-Back Feb 12 '12 at 21:48

Have you considered letting PDO itself throw exceptions instead of errors?

$this->pdo->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION); 

Now you can eliminate checking PDO errors which can significantly reduce code. You can add some try/catch block to catch exceptions that can be recovered from such as constraint violations.

For the rest just use a Try/Catch somewhere high up in your front end controller to catch the truly exceptional exceptions.

The only difference in my approach is that in BlogModel you just:

$stmt->execute();

No checking or anything else. Just let PDO throw an exception if the insert fails. Then you would use the try/catch in your controller as shown by ladar

Or in my case, if I was pretty sure the insert would never fail then I'd just use a generic try/catch block up in my front controller and not spend time trying to handle each possible exception manually.

share|improve this answer
    
Kind of a general request. Do you understand how to tell PDO to throw exceptions instead of generating errors? Basically use the setAttribute method I showed in my answer. And do you understand that once PDO is throwing exceptions there will no longer be a need to check errors from things like: $stmt->execute(); –  Cerad Feb 13 '12 at 1:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.