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I have a class called Employee with its 2 private variables and also contains its needed constructors and other necessary methods :

public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int id;

    public Employee() {
        name = " No Name!";
        id = 00100;
    }

    public Employee(String n, int i) {
        name = n;
        id = i;
    }

    public Employee(Employee originalObject) {
        name = originalObject.name;
        id = originalObject.id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public int getID() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setName(String newName) {
        if (newName == null) {
            System.out.println("Fatal Error setting employee name!");
            System.exit(0);
        } else {
            name = newName;
        }
    }

    public void setID(int newID) {
        id = newID;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return (name + " " + id);
    }

    public boolean equals(Employee otherEmployee) {
        return (name.equals(otherEmployee.name)
                && id == otherEmployee.id);
    }
}

This Employee class extends another class named as HourlyEmployee. The extended class is as follows:

public class HourlyEmployee extends Employee {

    private double wageRate;
    private double hours;

    public HourlyEmployee() {
        super();
        wageRate = 0;
        hours = 0;
    }

    public HourlyEmployee(String na, int di, double wR, double h) {
        super(na, di);
        if (wR >= 0 || h >= 0) {
            wageRate = wR;
            hours = h;
        } else {
            System.out.println("Fatal Error!: creating illegal hourly employee");
        }
        System.exit(0);
    }

    public HourlyEmployee(HourlyEmployee originalObject) {
        super(originalObject);
        wageRate = originalObject.wageRate;
        hours = originalObject.hours;
    }

    public double getRate() {
        return wageRate;
    }

    public double getHours() {
        return hours;
    }

    public double getPay() {
        return wageRate * hours;
    }

    public void setRate(double newWR) {
        if (newWR >= 0) {
            wageRate = newWR;
        } else {
            System.out.println("Fatal Error: negative hours worked!");
            System.exit(0);
        }
    }

    public String toString() {
        return (getName() + " " + getID() + "\n$" + wageRate + " per hour for " + hours + "hours");
    }
}

After I have done coding this class, I wrote the Demo class to test these classes and how it will work.

public class InheritanceDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        HourlyEmployee joe = new HourlyEmployee("Joe Worker", 281952, 50.50, 160);
        System.out.println("joe's longer name is " + joe.getName());
        System.out.println("Changing joe's name to joseph.");
        joe.setName("Joseph");
        System.out.println("joe's record is as follows: ");
        System.out.println(joe);
    }
}

Finally, I tried to compile the code and that worked fine, but, unfortunately, the demo class didn't run even though it showed me that " process completed" in the screen! What do you think is wrong with this program ?

share|improve this question
    
Can you also post the command used for compiling and for running? –  Ashwinee K Jha Feb 12 '12 at 20:25
    
Run your program in debugger to trace it. –  dbf Feb 12 '12 at 20:26
    
What does "didn't run" look like? Are you saying that the messages weren't written to the console? –  duffymo Feb 12 '12 at 20:26
    
I would guess that you have a bug. –  Hot Licks Feb 12 '12 at 20:27
1  
what do you mean with "didn't even run"? Do you mean: "I don't see the output I expect"? –  Jörg Beyer Feb 12 '12 at 20:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is with the first System.exit(0) in HourlyEmployee. Since there is no {} after that else, the exit is executed unconditionally.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! it works now. –  AbdullahR Feb 12 '12 at 20:42

Your constructor should NOT have a System.exit in it.

You shouldn't write out an error message, either. Throw an IllegalArgumentException.

Your HourlyEmployee ctor is borked. This is what you want:

public class HourlyEmployee extends Employee {

    private double wageRate;
    private double hours;

    public HourlyEmployee() {

        super();
        wageRate = 0;
        hours = 0;


    }

    public HourlyEmployee(String na, int di, double wR, double h) {

        super(na, di);
        if (wR < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("wage rate cannot be negative");
        if (h < 0) throw new IllegalAccessError("hours cannot be negative");
        wageRate = wR;
        hours = h;

    }

    public HourlyEmployee(HourlyEmployee originalObject) {

        super(originalObject);
        wageRate = originalObject.wageRate;
        hours = originalObject.hours;

    }

    public double getRate() {

        return wageRate;

    }

    public double getHours() {

        return hours;
    }

    public double getPay() {

        return wageRate * hours;

    }

    public void setRate(double newWR) {

        if (newWR < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("wage rate cannot be negative");
            wageRate = newWR;
    }

    public String toString() {

        return (getName() + " " + getID() + "\n$" + wageRate + " per hour for " + hours + "hours");
    }

}
share|improve this answer

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