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Making a small WCF test program which is based on a Store that has customers and each customer has a balance of special points. For now I want to focus on having a fixed number of customers, say 3. Problem is I can't wrap my head around where would I create those customers and how would I access them from the service's functions. I was thinking of creating an array of customers inside main() of the service so that they are available to the client later on, but is it a good idea? Very fresh to WCF and couldn't find any examples that would show how to implement something like that.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel.Description;

namespace StoreService
{

    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Uri baseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:6112/StoreService");
            ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(typeof(Store), baseAddress);
            try
            {
                host.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IStore), new WSHttpBinding(), "Store");
                ServiceMetadataBehavior smb = new ServiceMetadataBehavior();
                smb.HttpGetEnabled = true;
                host.Description.Behaviors.Add(smb);
                Console.WriteLine("The service is ready.");
                Console.WriteLine("Press <ENTER> to terminate the service.");
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.ReadLine();
                host.Close();

            }
            catch (CommunicationException ce)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("An exception occured: {0}", ce.Message);
                host.Abort();
            }
        }
    }

    [ServiceContract(Namespace="http://StoreService")]
    public interface IStore
    {
        [OperationContract]
        void AddPoints(string accNum, double points);

        [OperationContract]
        void SubtractPoints(string accNum, double points);

        [OperationContract]
        int CustomerPoints(string accNum);
    }

    [DataContract]
    public class Customer
    {
        private string accountNumber;
        private string name;
        private double points;

        [DataMember]
        public int AccountNumber
        {
            get { return accountNumber; }
            set { accountNumber = value; }
        }

        [DataMember]
        public string Name
        {
            get { return name; }
            set { name = value; }
        }

        [DataMember]
        public int Points
        {
            get { return points; }
            set { points = value; }
        }
    }


    public class Store : IStore
    {
        public void AddPoints(string accNum, double points)
        {
            //Add points logic
        }

        public void SubtractPoints(string accNum, double points);
        {
            //Substract points logic
        }

        public int CustomerPoints(string accNum)
        {
            //Show points
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your going to need an Interface to your service and the code for each of the methods exposed by your service.

This is off the top of my head, untested, the Microsoft examples will show you this stuff posted by Bryan

For example, add 2 new classes:

// First the Interface, things in here decorated with the Operation contract gets exposed, things with serializable are available to the client

namespace MyService
{
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface ICustomer
    {

        [OperationContract]
        int GetBalance(Guid CustomerId);
    }

    [Serializable]
    public class Customer
    {
        public Guid Id;
        public int Balance;
    }
}




// 2nd class file is the code mapping to the interface
namespace MyService
{
    private List<Customer> Customers = new List<Customer>();
    public class MyService : ICustomer
    {
        public int GetBalance(Guid CustomerId)
        {
            foreach(Customer c in Customers)
            {
                 if(c.Id == CustomerId)
                 {
                     return c.Balance;
                 }
            }
        }
    }
}
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Hmm. Looks interesting. Do I have to use Guid for the id of a Customer? I was planning to use string as per my source code. –  Bob Feb 12 '12 at 21:56
1  
Hi Bob, not at all, you can use whatever you like for your customer id. This was just an example so that you can see a little deeper in to the classes. –  Jeggs Feb 12 '12 at 22:00
    
Alright. Thanks! –  Bob Feb 12 '12 at 23:36

First, here's a bunch of good samples on WCF from MS to get you started. For this demo ware I would look at creating a method for generating all your 'test' data into some sort of collection and use that to play around with in your service. Once your comfortable with the concepts look at using a database as your data-store. Also look here for initializing a WCF service.

Also look at this similar post.

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