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I always thought the complexity of:

1 + 2 + 3 + ... + n is O(n), and summing two n by n matrices would be O(n^2).

But today I read from a textbook, "by the formula for the sum of the first n integers, this is n(n+1)/2" and then thus: (1/2)n^2 + (1/2)n, and thus O(n^2).

What am I missing here?

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2  
It would help to know what "this" is. You're right that adding up n things (doing something n times, each of cost O(1)) is O(n). But if instead of adding 1+2+3+ etc you had to do something once, and then do something twice, and then three times, etc., then after 1+2+3..+n were done you'd have done n*(n+1)/2 things, which is O(n^2). –  DSM Feb 12 '12 at 21:37
    
Missing? Well you found the formula for a summation which explained it. What else do you need help with? –  simchona Feb 12 '12 at 21:37
    
@DSM sorry for the ambiguity, the "this" is referring to 1 + 2 + 3 + ... + n –  user1032613 Feb 12 '12 at 22:02
1  
@user1032613: so just to be clear, the "and then thus" is your gloss, not what the book said? Because if so, then I think several of the answers below are correct and you're confusing the complexity of an algorithm for summing n numbers in general with the fact that it so happens that we can compute the sum of 1+2+..+n using a formula. Let's say we were summing n squares instead, 1+4+9+...n^2. The sum of those would be (n)(n+1)(2n+1)/6, but that wouldn't mean that adding n things together would become O(n^3); it would instead mean that in a special case we could get it in O(1). –  DSM Feb 12 '12 at 22:16
    
This link is very useful. –  Mohamed Ennahdi El Idrissi Apr 4 '14 at 1:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The big O notation can be used to determine the growth rate of any function.

In this case, it seems the book is not talking about the time complexity of computing the value, but about the value itself. And n(n+1)/2 is O(n^2).

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n(n+1)/2 is the quick way to sum a consecutive sequence of N integers (starting from 1). I think you're confusing an algorithm with big-oh notation!

If you thought of it as a function, then the big-oh complexity of this function is O(1):

public int sum_of_first_n_integers(int n) {
  return (n * (n+1))/2;
}

The naive implementation would have big-oh complexity of O(n).

public int sum_of_first_n_integers(int n) {
  int sum = 0;
  for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
    sum += n;
  }
  return sum;
}

Even just looking at each cell of a single n-by-n matrix is O(n^2), since the matrix has n^2 cells.

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I think this doesn't explain what is actually being asked: “How come the sum of the first n integers is O(n^2)”? –  svick Feb 12 '12 at 21:50

You are confusing complexity of runtime and the size (complexity) of the result.

The running time of summing, one after the other, the first n consecutive numbers is indeed O(n).1

But the complexity of the result, that is the size of “sum from 1 to n” = n(n – 1) / 2 is O(n ^ 2).


1 But for arbitrarily large numbers this is simplistic since adding large numbers takes longer than adding small numbers. For a precise runtime analysis, you indeed have to consider the size of the result. However, this isn’t usually relevant in programming, nor even in purely theoretical computer science. In both domains, summing numbers is usually considered an O(1) operation unless explicitly required otherwise by the domain (i.e. when implementing an operation for a bignum library).

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"The running time of summing the first n consecutive numbers is indeed O(n)" - No, it is the running time of adding n arbitrary numbers. The running time of summing first n consecutive numbers is the running time of applying the formula n*(n+1)/2, i.e. O(1). :) –  Serge Dundich Feb 14 '12 at 8:40
    
@Serge No. “summing the first n consecutive numbers” is an algorithm description. Contrast that with “the sum of the first n consecutive numbers”. The latter is concerned with the result. The former is concerned with the method, i.e. sum the integers one by one. I might have made that more explicit though … –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 14 '12 at 9:12
    
Of course it is a matter of terminology. And since it is not a formal description but just a conversation it may be context-depended. But in most contexts during a conversation "summing the first n consecutive numbers" or similar is not an algorithm - it is a task (a problem to solve). Not any particular implementation (algorithm) to solve this task but the task itself. And talking about time complexity of the task is talking about time complexity of the best possible algorithm solving it (in conversation because strictly speaking only algorithm may have running time). –  Serge Dundich Feb 14 '12 at 11:19

You have a formula that doesn't depend on the number of numbers being added, so it's a constant-time algorithm, or O(1).

If you add each number one at a time, then it's indeed O(n). The formula is a shortcut; it's a different, more efficient algorithm. The shortcut works when the numbers being added are all 1..n. If you have a non-contiguous sequence of numbers, then the shortcut formula doesn't work and you'll have to go back to the one-by-one algorithm.

None of this applies to the matrix of numbers, though. To add two matrices, it's still O(n^2) because you're adding n^2 distinct pairs of numbers to get a matrix of n^2 results.

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There's a difference between summing N arbitrary integers and summing N that are all in a row. For 1+2+3+4+...+N, you can take advantage of the fact that they can be divided into pairs with a common sum, e.g. 1+N = 2+(N-1) = 3+(N-2) = ... = N + 1. So that's N+1, N/2 times. (If there's an odd number, one of them will be unpaired, but with a little effort you can see that the same formula holds in that case.)

That is not O(N^2), though. It's just a formula that uses N^2, actually O(1). O(N^2) would mean (roughly) that the number of steps to calculate it grows like N^2, for large N. In this case, the number of steps is the same regardless of N.

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There really isn't a complexity of a problem, but rather a complexity of an algorithm.

In your case, if you choose to iterate through all the numbers, the the complexity is, indeed, O(n).

But that's not the most efficient algorithm. A more efficient one is to apply the formula - n*(n+1)/2, which is constant, and thus the complexity is O(1).

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answer of sum of series of n natural can be found using two ways. first way is by adding all the numbers in loop. in this case algorithm is linear and code will be like this

 int sum = 0;
     for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
     sum += n;
   }
 return sum;

it is analogous to 1+2+3+4+......+n. in this case complexity of algorithm is calculated as number of times addition operation is performed which is O(n).

second way of finding answer of sum of series of n natural number is direst formula n*(n+1)/2. this formula use multiplication instead of repetitive addition. multiplication operation has not linear time complexity. there are various algorithm available for multiplication which has time complexity ranging from O(N^1.45) to O (N^2). therefore in case of multiplication time complexity depends on the processor's architecture. but for the analysis purpose time complexity of multiplication is considered as O(N^2). therefore when one use second way to find the sum then time complexity will be O(N^2).

here multiplication operation is not same as the addition operation. if anybody has knowledge of computer organisation subject then he can easily understand the internal working of multiplication and addition operation. multiplication circuit is more complex than the adder circuit and require much higher time than the adder circuit to compute the result. so time complexity of sum of series can't be constant.

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