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Since all the examples in the guide are with lists, I find it difficult to see how to use pattern matching in Racket to write conditional matching like OCaml does, for example:

read ~var_a var_b s = match s.[0] with
    | _ when var_b >= var_a + 4 ->
        (* Do something *)
    | "a" when is_negative var_b -> 
        (* Do something else *)
    ...

How would I write something similar in Racket?

Thanks.

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

The racket/match library includes pattern matching that can use arbitrary predicates through the ? pattern. Along with and, you should be able to get Racket's matcher to behave. Although I'm a little weak in my OCaml, I think the following translation of the code above matches its meaning:

(define (my-read #:var-a var-a var-b s)
  (match (string-ref s 0)
    [(and _
          (? (lambda (_)
               (>= var-b (+ var-a 4)))))
     "do something"]
    [(and '#\a
          (? (lambda (_)
               (< var-b 0))))
     "do something else"]))

;; Exercising the first case:     
(my-read #:var-a 50
         60 "blah")

;; Exercising the second case:
(my-read #:var-a 50
         -40 "alphabet")

The ? matcher has an implicit and embedded within it, so the code can be expressed slightly more succinctly as:

(define (my-read #:var-a var-a var-b s) 
  (match (string-ref s 0)
    [(? (lambda (_)
          (>= var-b (+ var-a 4))))
     "do something"]
    [(? (lambda (_)
          (< var-b 0))
        #\a)
     "do something else"]))

In both, the lambdas in there aren't watching what got matched, so I just named them _ to denote a don't-care. But you can imagine more sophisticated patterns where the predicates could care deeply about what exactly got matched.

Eli suggests using a general cond here, since there isn't any significant pattern matching in the code. I agree. The code would look like this:

(define (my-read #:var-a var-a var-b s) 
  (cond
    [(>= var-b (+ var-a 4))
     "do something"]
    [(and (char=? (string-ref s 0) #\a)
          (< var-b 0))
     "do something else"]))
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3  
Using so many ? suggests that it'd be expressed better with a plain cond... – Eli Barzilay Feb 12 '12 at 23:41

Pattern-matching can easily be translated into a sequence of tests, there is no language where you cannot do that.

What's great with OCaml (and probably Haskell) pattern-matching is that the compiler translates the code into the optimal sequence of tests when it is possible (i.e. the program will never test twice the same condition, at least when you avoid the when guards).

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1  
I would expect that the same happens in Racket, since it has explicit pattern matching capablities, no? – GiantSquid Feb 15 '12 at 21:32
1  
It's probably the case if you use match, but not if you use cond. But I am no expert in Racket, only in OCaml. – Fabrice Le Fessant Feb 15 '12 at 22:09

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