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I have two table:

1. Lecturers (LectID, Fname, Lname, degree).
2. Lecturers_Specialization (LectID, Expertise).

I want to find the lecturer with the most Specialization. When I try this, it is not working:

SELECT  L.LectID,Fname,Lname
FROM Lecturers L,Lecturers_Specialization S
WHERE L.LectID=S.LectID and COUNT(S.Expertise)>=ALL
(SELECT COUNT(Expertise) FROM Lecturers_Specialization GROUP BY LectID); 

But when I try this, it works:

SELECT  L.LectID,Fname,Lname
FROM Lecturers L,Lecturers_Specialization S
WHERE L.LectID=S.LectID
GROUP BY L.LectID,Fname,Lname
HAVING COUNT(S.Expertise)>=ALL
(SELECT COUNT(Expertise) FROM Lecturers_Specialization GROUP BY LectID); 

What is the reason? Thanks.

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Can you clarify which version of SQL you are using (MySQL, MS SQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, etc.). Also, when you say "doesn't working", do you mean the results aren't as you expect, or that there is a compile/parse error? –  jklemmack Feb 12 '12 at 22:20
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3 Answers

up vote 46 down vote accepted

WHERE clause introduces a condition on individual rows; HAVING clause introduces a condition on aggregations, i.e. results of selection where a single result, such as count, average, min, max, or sum, has been produced from multiple rows. Your query calls for a second kind of condition (i.e. a condition on an aggregation) hence HAVING works correctly.

As a rule of thumb, use WHERE before GROUP BY and HAVING after GROUP BY. It is a rather primitive rule, but it is useful in 90+ %% of cases.

While you're at it, you may want to re-write your query using ANSI version of the join:

SELECT  L.LectID,Fname,Lname
FROM Lecturers L
JOIN Lecturers_Specialization S ON L.LectID=S.LectID
GROUP BY L.LectID,Fname,Lname
HAVING COUNT(S.Expertise)>=ALL
(SELECT COUNT(Expertise) FROM Lecturers_Specialization GROUP BY LectID)

This would eliminate WHERE that was used as a theta join condition.

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HAVING operates on aggregates. Since COUNT is an aggregate function, you can't use it in a WHERE clause.

Here's some reading from MSDN on aggregate functions.

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You can not use where clause with aggregate functions b'coz where fetch records on the basis of condition, it goes into table record by record and then fetch record on the basis of condition we have give. So that time we can not where clause. While having clause works on the resultSet which we finally get after running a query.

Eg:

select empName, sum(Bonus) from employees order by empName having sum(Bonus) > 5000;

This will store the resultSet in a temporary memory, then having clause will perform it's work. So we can easily use aggregate functions here.

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