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I have a python dictionary, definition of which does not fit in a single line. Could anyone please tell me guidelines for python dictionaries. I currently have this which does not look good to my eyes.

initialstate =  {
                    'state':grid,
                    'f':find_manhattan_distance(grid,goal),
                    'g':0,
                    'h':find_manhattan_distance(grid,goal),
                    'ancestor': None
                }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

pep8.py says:

mydict.py:2:28: E231 missing whitespace after ':'
mydict.py:1:15: E222 multiple spaces after operator

Try this:

initialstate = {
    'state': grid,
    'f': find_manhatten_distance(grid, goal),
    'g': 0,
    'h': find_manhatten_distance(grid, goal),
    'ancestor': None
}

Notice the change in spacing after commas and operators. This version passes all the pep8.py tests.

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1  
ugh, if pep8.py says you can't have a newline after {, then pep8.py is dead wrong.. :( –  Ned Batchelder Feb 12 '12 at 22:56
    
It does not say you can't have a newline after {. I'll edit the answer... –  snim2 Feb 12 '12 at 23:00
    
Thanks snim2. I also had a look at pep8.py :) –  riship89 Feb 13 '12 at 0:03

People differ on how best to format things like this. I prefer:

initialstate =  {
    'state': grid,
    'f': find_manhattan_distance(grid, goal),
    'g': 0,
    'h': find_manhattan_distance(grid, goal),
    'ancestor': None,
    }

Things I like about this style:

  1. It allows multiple nestings easily. Indenting under the open-brace would instead cause far too much indentation after just two levels.
  2. The comma after the last item means I can add another line without changing the current last one.
  3. The closing brace indented follows other Python visual style, where there is no obvious termination line, simply the undent to indicate the end of the block.

(PS: "Manhattan" has only a's in it..)

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Thanks. I will correct the spelling :) –  riship89 Feb 12 '12 at 23:56

You can choose between the following options (and some more):

initialstate = {
    'state': grid,
    'f': find_manhatten_distance(grid,goal),
    'g': 0,
    'h': find_manhatten_distance(grid,goal),
    'ancestor': None,
    }
  • Pro: version-control friendly: lines (including the first) can be removed or inserted without affecting more than 1 line (BTW, this only applies if you add the leading ,)
  • Pro: Lots of horizontal space for the items
  • Con: Maybe it's not immediately obvious that the dict is assigned to initialstate

initialstate = { 'state': grid,
                 'f': find_manhatten_distance(grid,goal),
                 'g': 0,
                 'h': find_manhatten_distance(grid,goal),
                 'ancestor': None, }
  • Pro: Very compact, makes maximum use of available horizontal space
  • Pro: Preserves the usual semantics of variable left, value right, thus making it absolutely clear what's assigned where
  • Con: If the variable name is very long, you might run out of space
  • Con: Not very version-control friendly: adding or removing lines or even changing the name of the variable will cause diffs
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For dictionary initializations where the keys are strings, you might try the dict(...) constructor with keyword arguments rather than the {...} dict literal syntax, because it'll remove all the extra quotes you'll otherwise find cluttering the definition.

initialstate = dict(state    = grid,
                    f        = find_manhattan_distance(grid, goal),
                    g        = 0,
                    h        = find_manhattan_distance(grid, goal),
                    ancestor = None)

As you can see, I also like to line up the equals signs so I can just scan down and easily see the assignments.

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