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Okay, this should be an easy one for the pros out there (disclaimer, I'm sort of a noob in Obj-C, mainly I use in C#). I have a UIViewController subclass; one of its properties is an AVAudioPlayer object. When I write this code:

NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"example" ofType:@"caf"];
NSURL *url = [[NSURL alloc] initFileURLWithPath:path];
[player initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];
[url release];
[player setDelegate:self];
[player prepareToPlay];
[player play];

Nothing happens.

When I do this, which is clearly the correct way of doing it:

NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"example" ofType:@"caf"];
NSURL *url = [[NSURL alloc] initFileURLWithPath:path];
AVAudioPlayer *ap = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];
self.player = ap;
[ap release];
[url release];
[player setDelegate:self];
[player prepareToPlay];
[player play];

...everything works beautifully.

Why do I need to allocate an object and then set my property equal to that? Apologies if this is a way-too-common question.

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If possible use ARC, then there are no retain/release or autorelease statements. There also some optimizations that the compiler can make. Also there are convenience methods like: NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:path]; which can make you life easier. –  Zaph Feb 13 '12 at 0:03

3 Answers 3

This is because in your first example you are not creating the AVAudioPlayer with alloc. This means you don't actually have a valid AVAudioPlayer in memory.

And also you are not using taking the return value of init*. Since init often works on the instance itself, this would probably work in many cases if you had done the alloc and assigned it to player, but you can't rely on this, and its the convention to use the return value with a Class *var = [[Class alloc] init] form.

If you wanted shorter working code, you could replace

[player initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];

with

self.player = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];
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Initially, your player instance variable is set to nil (the equivalent of null in C#), much like reference fields are automatically set to null when you construct an object in C#. Unlike C#, however, calling something on nil does nothing (in opposition to throwing a NullReferenceException). Therefore, you need to assign something to player before it can do something; otherwise, the call silently fails.

In C#, you have new Foo(), which actually does two things: it allocates memory for a Foo object, and then calls a constructor on that allocated memory; all in one step. In Objective-C, those two steps are distinct. alloc allocates memory, and init is the "constructor". In your first code snippet, you skip the allocation step, so nothing happens. You should get correct results by using this:

player = [AVAudioPlayer alloc];
player = [player initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];

Or, more concisely:

player = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];

Also notice that the init methods actually return a value. It's important that you use it to refer to the object afterwards

id foo = [Foo alloc];
foo = [foo init]; // correct

id foo = [[Foo alloc] init]; // correct too

id foo = [Foo alloc];
[foo init]; // incorrect

The reason is that the init method is allowed to return a completely different object; it can even be of a different class. Objective-C being a "duck-typed" language, as long as the type you return implements the same methods the class you advertise has, everything is good. (For instance, on Mac OS, you'll never see an actual instance of NSString. Instead, you'll see NSCFString and a couple others.)

I also recommend you turn on the automatic retain count feature of the Objective-C language, as it frees you of most memory management routines (retain/release mostly).

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+1 for the C# details –  Michael Chinen Feb 12 '12 at 23:44

You have to create the object from the class.

This guy is the same as your C# constructor. It allocates the memory for the new object and initializes it with the parameters url and NULL.

[[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL]

If you're only using the player once in the life of the object that you're working in then you don't need "self.player" as an instance variable. Remove it from your header file completely and change your code to look like this:

NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"example" ofType:@"caf"];
NSURL *url = [[NSURL alloc] initFileURLWithPath:path];
AVAudioPlayer *ap = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];    
[url release];
[ap setDelegate:self];
[ap prepareToPlay];
[ap play];
[ap release];

If you need to keep that player around or access it elsewhere then you need to keep your instance variable "player". Your code should look like this:

NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"example" ofType:@"caf"];
NSURL *url = [[NSURL alloc] initFileURLWithPath:path];
self.player = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:url error:NULL];
[url release];
[player setDelegate:self];
[player prepareToPlay];
[player play];

Then you'll have to release player at a later point in time like the dealloc of the self class.

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