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When defining an ASyncTask and it associated methods in Android there are 3 dots that appear, eg protected Long doInBackground(URL... urls)

What do the dots mean?

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1  
That it's an array, ... instead of [] – Bill Gary Feb 12 '12 at 23:45
    
so int[] numbers and int... numbers means the same thing? – Robert de Klerk Feb 12 '12 at 23:46
    
yup, I'm not sure why AsyncTask does it that way though. – Bill Gary Feb 12 '12 at 23:48
    
Cool thanks man! – Robert de Klerk Feb 12 '12 at 23:49
    
"..." is not the same as "[]", they somehow refers to the same things but with different usage. And this is not AsyncTask specific, but many classes and methods use this also. "..." in the parameter allows the caller to put indefinite number of parameter, while for "[]", you have to create an array with definite size in advance. E.g. someMethod(String... param) => when calling, you can do this: someMethod(p1, p2, p3, p4) or simply someMethod(p1). – Victor Wong Feb 13 '12 at 1:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not entirely the same thing. Consider the following examples

Example 1:

public String concatenateStrings(String... strings){
  StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
  for( int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++ )
    sb.append( strings[i] );

  return sb.toString();
}

Example 2:

public String concatenateStrings2(String[] strings){
  StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
  for( int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++ )
    sb.append( strings[i] );

  return sb.toString();
}

They're allmost identical, right? Wrong, calling them is the big difference. The first example allows for an undefined number of strings to be added.

Example 1:

concantenateStrings("hello", "World", " I ", " can ", " add ", " so ", " many strings here" );

Example 2:

Strings[] myStrings = new Strings[7];
myStrings[0] = "Hello";
myStrings[1] = "world";
myStrings[2] = " I ";
...
myStrings[6] = " many strings here";
concatenateStrings2( myStrings );
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This is not AsynTask specific or Android specific for that matter. It's a Java feature to pass variable length of parameters to a method.

Have a look at: Method that accepts variable number of arguments?

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It java concept. It looks like array. (and you process it mostly like you process on array). But, it 's different in some points.

You will meet this commonly in android, for example when you use view animation or property animation for layout.

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