Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to flash and programming in general but am learning it to make games. I'm currently messing around with hit detection and its not to hard to test in the game tick ( fired from onEnterFrame).

What I'm wondering is if it would be possible / useful to create a custom event that i can listen for. And make the eventListener hear when a collision happens.

Also would this be better or worse for the cpu than testing the collisions of lots of enemies on a screen?

Cheers, Tyler

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Marty Wallace gave you an exhaustive example of how you might implement custom events for a physics engine. Now I'm going to attempt to weigh in on the question of whether it's worth the strain on the CPU :

The answer is a definite... "Maybe?"

First thing to remember is that an event system like the one implemented in Flash is heavy weight. Here's what happens implicitly when an event is dispatched:

  1. An instantiation of an event object
  2. [N] function calls passing that event object to [N] listeners
  3. If you use event bubbling to traverse the display list, then a new instantiation occurs at every level of the display list (good to remember when considering mouse events like MOUSE_MOVE, MOUSE_OVER, ROLL_OVER, MOUSE_OUT, ROLL_OUT, et al)

So, if you have a system set up such that many collisions may happen and notify many listeners then you have many function calls and many instantiations happening inside your update loop. That's bad. How bad? I like to point to www.jacksondunstan.com for examples of how to optimize AS3. He explains in detail what happens inside the player when you perform action X, and supplies some good benchmarks for all his tests.

If you don't feel like reading his entire blog though, the problem with all these instantiations is that they'll generate a lot of short-lived garbage that will provoke frequent GC runs. You want to avoid that if at all possible in a performance-intensive game. Other things you might want to avoid would be string concatination, or convenience functions that return new object instances as a side-effect (localToGlobal for instance).

At that point, the question is "what constitutes 'performance-intensive'"?

That's really something you'll have to determine for yourself.

Personally I have mostly abandoned the Flash event system. When I need to notify objects of events, I'll do so directly. I rarely need the overhead of the native event system in the context of a game.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I figured it would be but I wanted to put out a feeler because I wasn't totally sure and I didn't want to leave a stone unturned just in case. –  Timothy Mayes Feb 13 '12 at 5:08

Creating the custom event:

Firstly, you'll probably want to create your own event class that will extend Event. The reasoning behind this is that you can add properties that you will likely need to use within the listening function.

Your basic event will begin by looking like this:

public class PhysicsEvent extends Event
{
    public function PhysicsEvent(type:String, bubbles:Boolean = false, cancelable:Boolean = false)
    {
        super(type, bubbles, cancelable);
    }
}

The first thing you'll want to add to your event is probably some constants that represent the type of event you're going to dispatch. As an example, you may want to add:

public static const COLLISION:String = "collision";

This can represent an event that is fired when a collision between two objects has been detected.

Some information you might want to access when a collision has occurred could include the two participants in the collision and maybe some numeric information such as angle between the participants as well as distance. You can add these to your custom event class as well:

public var p1:GameEntity;
public var p2:GameEntity;
public var angle:Number;
public var distance:Number;

Alltogether, your class should look like this now:

public class PhysicsEvent extends Event
{
    public static const COLLISION:String = "collision";

    public var p1:GameEntity;
    public var p2:GameEntity;
    public var angle:Number;
    public var distance:Number;

    public function PhysicsEvent(type:String, bubbles:Boolean = false, cancelable:Boolean = false)
    {
        super(type, bubbles, cancelable);
    }
}

Dispatching the event:

Unfortunately you'll still need to use Event.ENTER_FRAME to step through all of your game objects and test for collisions as you're doing currently. Generally what you'd do here is have a Physics class or similar which contains a list of all your physics objects and checks for collisions between them every time you've finished moving all of your game objects.

The function which assesses possible collisions may look something like this:

for each(var a:PhysicsObject in physicsObjects)
{
    for each(var b:PhysicsObject in physicsObjects)
    {
        if(a == b) continue; // Prevent objects from colliding with themselves.

        // Check for a collision between a and b.
    }
}

When there is a collision between a and b, you'll be able to prepare for a dispatch of an instance of your event with information regarding the two, for example:

// Collision was detected, prepare an event for dispatch.
var evt:PhysicsEvent = new PhysicsEvent(PhysicsEvent.COLLISION);

You'll then need to assign some information to your event before you can dispatch it:

evt.p1 = a;
evt.p2 = b;
evt.angle = <insert angle math. hint: Math.atan2>;
evt.distance = <insert distance math. hint: pythag>;

And finally, you can dispatch this event:

dispatchEvent(evt);

Listening:

Assuming that you've dispatched your event from an instance of a class that deals with the game physics, you can attach the event listener to that instance. It may look like this:

physics.addEventListener(PhysicsEvent.COLLISION, onCollision);

Prepare your listening function:

function onCollision(e:PhysicsEvent):void
{
    // Todo.
}

And fill this function to do whatever you need to do with the two objects that collided:

function onCollision(e:PhysicsEvent):void
{
    // Push participants away from each other.
    e.p1.x -= Math.cos(e.angle) * (e.distance/2);
    e.p1.y -= Math.sin(e.angle) * (e.distance/2);
    e.p2.x += Math.cos(e.angle) * (e.distance/2);
    e.p2.y += Math.sin(e.angle) * (e.distance/2);
}

Hopefully this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent detail, always impressed. +1 –  ToddBFisher Feb 13 '12 at 1:01
    
Did not expect such a thorough answer. Thanks a lot. –  Timothy Mayes Feb 13 '12 at 5:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.