Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I read that in a 32bit machine, one can use the CAS operation with aligned 64bit blocks. Similarly, in a 64bit machine, one can use the CAS operation with aligned 128bit blocks.

I'm using a 32bit machine so I tried the following:

// sizeof(long long) is 8 bytes, so 64 bits
long long y = 12;
long long z = 12;
long long x = 99;
__sync_bool_compare_and_swap(&y, z, x);

and the CAS succeeded changing the value of y to 99.

But then I tried using a char array[8];(which size is 64 bits) instead of a long long. And I do:

char full[8] = {'0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7'}; 
char full2[8] = {'0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7'};   
char full3[8] = {'5', '8', '9', 'G', 'X', '5', '6', 'U'};
__sync_bool_compare_and_swap(full, full2, full3);  

But in this case, the CAS fails although full and full2 have exactly the same data. (I also checked that full and full2 where correctly alligned)

So the first time it seems that a CAS can be used to 64bit, but the second time it seems it can't. Any ideas why?

EDIT

(How about 64bit machines?)

Ok, so the problem was that I was using char * in my CAS and these were only checked. So the solution was to cast to long long or to uint64_t which are 64bit values.

But what should I do with a 64bit machine when I need to use 128bit value? long long is still 64bit in a 64bit machine and uint128_t doesn't seem to exist in C. So to which type should I cast? double long seems to be 128bit in my 64bit machine, but when doing the following:

  double long y = 32432143243214;
  double long z = 32432143243214;

  int x = __sync_bool_compare_and_swap(&y, z, 1234321990);

I get this compile error error: incompatible type for argument 1 of ‘__sync_bool_compare_and_swap’.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like you are decaying to pointer and not passing the value –  David Heffernan Feb 13 '12 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like you forgot to deref your pointers and cast.

I tested and this is the only combination that is correct:

__sync_bool_compare_and_swap((long long*)full, *(long long *)full2, *(long long *)full3);

You need to cast the first param or it will only swap the first char.

Regarding handling 128-bit double long, this is from the gcc 4.1.2 docs.

The definition given in the Intel documentation allows only for the use of the types int, long, long long as well as their unsigned counterparts. GCC will allow any integral scalar or pointer type that is 1, 2, 4 or 8 bytes in length.

So it would seem you cannot use this function to handle that case.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, worked :) –  Fooko R. Feb 13 '12 at 0:36
    
You can pass name of array as address - You shouldn't cast it for that. (Size of different pointer types may differ, but we already missed here with UB) –  asaelr Feb 13 '12 at 0:39
    
The compiler checks pointer types as well, and this function is overloaded for several pointer types, so it matters here (e.g. f(int*) and f(char*) will call different functions depending on the cast). I tried your solution and it only swapped the first char. –  Michael Chinen Feb 13 '12 at 0:43
    
Thanks. I didn't think about that overloading. –  asaelr Feb 13 '12 at 0:50
    
Thanks for answering (once more), could you check my edit (in the question)? –  Fooko R. Feb 13 '12 at 0:51

You should pass the value of full2 and full3, not a pointer to it. Also, you should be care about the alignment.

__sync_bool_compare_and_swap((long long*)full,*(long long*)full2,*(long long*)full3);

(Of course, this is not portable. If you want portability, use uint64_t instead of long long)

share|improve this answer
1  
__sync_bool_compare_and_swap/CMPXCHG*B itself isn't something portable. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 13 '12 at 0:39
    
I tested it and this yields an incorrect output: 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, –  Michael Chinen Feb 13 '12 at 0:50
    
Thanks for answering, could you check my edit (in the question)? –  Fooko R. Feb 13 '12 at 0:50
    
Since you changed your answer to match mine, would you consider adding something original or deleting it to prevent noise? For the comment's sake, the original answer you posted was __sync_bool_compare_and_swap(full,(long long)full2,(long long)full3), without casting the first pointer. –  Michael Chinen Feb 13 '12 at 1:03
1  
Yes, but my initial comment, which users see before the edit history, would be confusing, without my second comment. –  Michael Chinen Feb 13 '12 at 1:19

You are passing a char * to __sync_bool_compare_and_swap. Assuming your char arrays (all three of them!) are properly aligned to 64 bits (if they're allocated in the way you show, they may not be - use malloc!), try casting to (long long *) before passing to __sync_bool_compare_and_swap. Failing that, use inline assembler and invoke CMPXCHG8B directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answering, could you check my edit (in the question)? –  Fooko R. Feb 13 '12 at 0:51
    
@FookoR., open a new question for the 128-bit CAS question, it has a very different answer (toss me a link to it once you do) –  bdonlan Feb 14 '12 at 5:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.