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In one of my Java 6 applications I have a thread that feeds the main thread with data, while also prefetching more records from a DB. It uses an ArrayBlockingQueue queue as a FIFO buffer and its main loop is something along these lines:

while (!Thread.interrupted()) {
    if (source.hasNext()) {
        try {
            queue.put(source.next())
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            break;
        }
    } else {
        break;
    }
}

There is code that does a bit of clean-up after the loop terminates, such as poisoning the queue and releasing any resources, but this is pretty much all about it.

As it stands, there is no direct communication from the main thread to the feeder thread: the feeder thread is set-up with the proper options and then left on its own, using the blocking queue to control the data flow.

The problem appears when the main thread needs to shutdown the feeder when the queue is full. Since there is no direct control channel, the shutdown method uses the Thread interface to interrupt() the feeder thread. Unfortunately, in most cases the feeder thread remains blocked in put(), despite being interrupted - no exception is thrown.

From a brief perusal of the interrupt() documentation and the queue implementation source code, it seems to me that quite often put() blocks without using any of the interruptible facilities of the JVM. More specifically, on my current JVM (OpenJDK 1.6b22), it blocks on the sun.misc.Unsafe.park() native method. Perhaps it uses a spinlock or something else, but in any case, this seems to fall under the following case:

If none of the previous conditions hold then this thread's interrupt status will be set.

A status flag is set, but the thread is still blocked in put() and does not iterate further so that the flag can be checked. The result? A zombie thread that just won't die!

  1. Is my understanding on this issue correct, or am I missing something?

  2. What are the possible approaches to fix this issue? Right now I can only think of two solutions:

    a. Calling poll() a bunch of times on the queue to unblock the feeder thread: Ugly and not very reliable from what I've seen, but it mostly works.

    b. Use the offer() method with a timeout instead of put() to allow the thread to check its interrupt status within an acceptable time frame.

Unless I am missing something, this is a somewhat underdocumented caveat of the BlockingQueue implementations in Java. There seem to be some indications of it when the documentation e.g. suggests poisoning the queues to shutdown a worker thread, but I cannot find any explicit reference.

EDIT:

OK, there is a more, uh, drastic variation of solution (a) above: ArrayBlockingQueue.clear(). I think this should always work, even if it's not exactly the definition of elegance...

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think there are two possible causes to your issue.

  1. As described in The Law of the Sabotaged Doorbell you may not be handling the interrupt correctly. There you will find:

    What should we do when we call code that may cause an InterruptedException? Don't immediately yank out the batteries! Typically there are two answers to that question:

    Rethrow the InterruptedException from your method. This is usually the easiest and best approach. It is used by the new java.util.concurrent.* package, which explains why we are now constantly coming into contact with this exception.
    Catch it, set interrupted status, return. If you are running in a loop that calls code which may cause the exception, you should set the status back to being interrupted.

    For example:

    while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
        // do something
        try {
            TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            break;
        }
    }
    
  2. Either source.hasNext() or source.next() are consuming and discarding the interrupt status. See Added below for how I solved this problem.

I am confident that interrupting a thread at ArrayBlockingqueue.put() is an effective solution.

Added

I solved problem 2 using a CloseableBlockingQueue which can be closed from the reader end. In this way, once it is closed, all put calls will shortcut. You can then check the closed flag of the queue from the writer.

// A blocking queue I can close from the pull end. 
// Please only use put because offer does not shortcut on close.
// <editor-fold defaultstate="collapsed" desc="// Exactly what it says on the tin.">
class CloseableBlockingQueue<E> extends ArrayBlockingQueue<E> {
  // Flag indicates closed state.
  private volatile boolean closed = false;
  // All blocked threads. Actually this is all threads that are in the process
  // of invoking a put but if put doesn't block then they disappear pretty fast.
  // NB: Container is O(1) for get and almost O(1) (depending on how busy it is) for put.
  private final Container<Thread> blocked;

  // Limited size.
  public CloseableBlockingQueue(int queueLength) {
    super(queueLength);
    blocked = new Container<Thread>(queueLength);
  }

  /**
   * *
   * Shortcut to do nothing if closed.
   *
   * Track blocked threads.
   */
  @Override
  public void put(E e) throws InterruptedException {
    if (!closed) {
      Thread t = Thread.currentThread();
      // Hold my node on the stack so removal can be trivial.
      Container.Node<Thread> n = blocked.add(t);
      try {
        super.put(e);
      } finally {
        // Not blocked anymore.
        blocked.remove(n, t);
      }
    }
  }

  /**
   *
   * Shortcut to do nothing if closed.
   */
  @Override
  public E poll() {
    E it = null;
    // Do nothing when closed.
    if (!closed) {
      it = super.poll();
    }
    return it;
  }

  /**
   *
   * Shortcut to do nothing if closed.
   */
  @Override
  public E poll(long l, TimeUnit tu) throws InterruptedException {
    E it = null;
    // Do nothing when closed.
    if (!closed) {
      it = super.poll(l, tu);
    }
    return it;
  }

  /**
   *
   * isClosed
   */
  boolean isClosed() {
    return closed;
  }

  /**
   *
   * Close down everything.
   */
  void close() {
    // Stop all new queue entries.
    closed = true;
    // Must unblock all blocked threads.

    // Walk all blocked threads and interrupt them.
    for (Thread t : blocked) {
      //log("! Interrupting " + t.toString());
      // Interrupt all of them.
      t.interrupt();
    }
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return blocked.toString();
  }
}

You will also need the Container which is lock-free and O(1) put/get (although it is not strictly a collection). It uses a Ring behind the scenes.

public class Container<T> implements Iterable<T> {

  // The capacity of the container.
  final int capacity;
  // The list.
  AtomicReference<Node<T>> head = new AtomicReference<Node<T>>();

  // Constructor
  public Container(int capacity) {
    this.capacity = capacity;
    // Construct the list.
    Node<T> h = new Node<T>();
    Node<T> it = h;
    // One created, now add (capacity - 1) more
    for (int i = 0; i < capacity - 1; i++) {
      // Add it.
      it.next = new Node<T>();
      // Step on to it.
      it = it.next;
    }
    // Make it a ring.
    it.next = h;
    // Install it.
    head.set(h);
  }

  // Empty ... NOT thread safe.
  public void clear() {
    Node<T> it = head.get();
    for (int i = 0; i < capacity; i++) {
      // Trash the element
      it.element = null;
      // Mark it free.
      it.free.set(true);
      it = it.next;
    }
    // Clear stats.
    resetStats();
  }

  // Add a new one.
  public Node<T> add(T element) {
    // Get a free node and attach the element.
    return getFree().attach(element);
  }

  // Find the next free element and mark it not free.
  private Node<T> getFree() {
    Node<T> freeNode = head.get();
    int skipped = 0;
    // Stop when we hit the end of the list 
    // ... or we successfully transit a node from free to not-free.
    while (skipped < capacity && !freeNode.free.compareAndSet(true, false)) {
      skipped += 1;
      freeNode = freeNode.next;
    }
    if (skipped < capacity) {
      // Put the head as next.
      // Doesn't matter if it fails. That would just mean someone else was doing the same.
      head.set(freeNode.next);
    } else {
      // We hit the end! No more free nodes.
      throw new IllegalStateException("Capacity exhausted.");
    }
    return freeNode;
  }

  // Mark it free.
  public void remove(Node<T> it, T element) {
    // Remove the element first.
    it.detach(element);
    // Mark it as free.
    if (!it.free.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
      throw new IllegalStateException("Freeing a freed node.");
    }
  }

  // The Node class. It is static so needs the <T> repeated.
  public static class Node<T> {

    // The element in the node.
    private T element;
    // Are we free?
    private AtomicBoolean free = new AtomicBoolean(true);
    // The next reference in whatever list I am in.
    private Node<T> next;

    // Construct a node of the list
    private Node() {
      // Start empty.
      element = null;
    }

    // Attach the element.
    public Node<T> attach(T element) {
      // Sanity check.
      if (this.element == null) {
        this.element = element;
      } else {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("There is already an element attached.");
      }
      // Useful for chaining.
      return this;
    }

    // Detach the element.
    public Node<T> detach(T element) {
      // Sanity check.
      if (this.element == element) {
        this.element = null;
      } else {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Removal of wrong element.");
      }
      // Useful for chaining.
      return this;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return element != null ? element.toString() : "null";
    }
  }

  // Provides an iterator across all items in the container.
  public Iterator<T> iterator() {
    return new UsedNodesIterator<T>(this);
  }

  // Iterates across used nodes.
  private static class UsedNodesIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> {
    // Where next to look for the next used node.

    Node<T> it;
    int limit = 0;
    T next = null;

    public UsedNodesIterator(Container<T> c) {
      // Snapshot the head node at this time.
      it = c.head.get();
      limit = c.capacity;
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
      if (next == null) {
        // Scan to the next non-free node.
        while (limit > 0 && it.free.get() == true) {
          it = it.next;
          // Step down 1.
          limit -= 1;
        }
        if (limit != 0) {
          next = it.element;
        }
      }
      return next != null;
    }

    public T next() {
      T n = null;
      if ( hasNext () ) {
        // Give it to them.
        n = next;
        next = null;
        // Step forward.
        it = it.next;
        limit -= 1;
      } else {
        // Not there!!
        throw new NoSuchElementException ();
      }
      return n;
    }

    public void remove() {
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Not supported.");
    }
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder();
    Separator comma = new Separator(",");
    // Keep counts too.
    int usedCount = 0;
    int freeCount = 0;
    // I will iterate the list myself as I want to count free nodes too.
    Node<T> it = head.get();
    int count = 0;
    s.append("[");
    // Scan to the end.
    while (count < capacity) {
      // Is it in-use?
      if (it.free.get() == false) {
        // Grab its element.
        T e = it.element;
        // Is it null?
        if (e != null) {
          // Good element.
          s.append(comma.sep()).append(e.toString());
          // Count them.
          usedCount += 1;
        } else {
          // Probably became free while I was traversing.
          // Because the element is detached before the entry is marked free.
          freeCount += 1;
        }
      } else {
        // Free one.
        freeCount += 1;
      }
      // Next
      it = it.next;
      count += 1;
    }
    // Decorate with counts "]used+free".
    s.append("]").append(usedCount).append("+").append(freeCount);
    if (usedCount + freeCount != capacity) {
      // Perhaps something was added/freed while we were iterating.
      s.append("?");
    }
    return s.toString();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I had lightly discarded this possibility, because the feeder thread spends far more time waiting in put(). Yet this actually sounds plausible. The source object belongs to a third-party DB-related library - with all that networking code, there has to be an InterruptedException thrown somewhere, yet the top level methods do not throw them... Sigh, I hate digging in third-party code... –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 1:09
    
Oh, for crying out loud... Whoever wrote this library has it swallowing every single InterruptedException that is thrown! Every single one! Who writes code like this? –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 1:22
    
BTW, setting the thread status back to interrupted changes nothing as far as this particular thread is concerned - once the loop breaks the road lead straight to termination. And I am not getting any exceptions to handle, anyway... –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 1:30
    
I've added my CloseablBlockingQueue code. So long as you check it's closed status in your feeder thread all should be well. On close, if the thread is blocked on put it will get its interrupt. If not it will silently consume all puts until you notice it is closed. –  OldCurmudgeon Feb 13 '12 at 9:14
    
I'll +1 and accept this answer for pointing out a possibility that I had discarded and for a catch-all solution in the form of code :-) I am not fully convinced that the third party library is solely responsible for what I am seeing, but I don't really have the time to investigate further. –  thkala Feb 14 '12 at 22:21
private AtomicBoolean shutdown = new AtomicBoolean();

void shutdown()
{
   shutdown.set(true);
}

while (!shutdown.get()) {
    if (source.hasNext()) {
       Object item = source.next();
       while (!shutdown.get() && !queue.offer(item, 100, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)) {
          continue;
       }
    }
    else {
       break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. The Thread.interrupted() call in my code should not matter - by the time it returns the thread is well on its way to termination. –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 2:12
    
2. Good catch! I missed a break statement when simplifying the code for my StackOverflow post. I have edited it back to the question. –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 2:13
    
3. I do want to stop the feeder thread long before the main thread terminates. Not only it is not useful any more, but it consumes significant resources - at least a DB connection and a reference that stops the GC from clearing the queue. –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 2:15
    
Is it possible that the main thread can set a shutdown flag of some sort in the feeder thread? You said there is no direct communication channel, but can there be? I would suggest that controlling a thread's lifetime by interruption only is poor design, and as you've seen can be interfered with by third party code beyond your control. –  brettw Feb 13 '12 at 2:17
    
Well, I could add a shared atomic variable or something, I suppose. I think, though, that I'd still have the problem that the feeder thread loop is blocked and will not even check the condition. I'd have to add condition checks all over the loop body, which is rather ugly. Right now the queue.clear() sledgehammer approach seems to work fine, so I'll keep it and see what happens... –  thkala Feb 13 '12 at 2:23

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