Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've set-up 2-way binding between my form (it has 32 controls) and an instance of my class but each character entered in a TextBox has that 1/2 second delay which makes the application almost unusable.
When I use DataSourceUpdateMode.Never, the problem does not occur which clearly indicates the 2-way binding is the culprit.

Note that if I set DataSourceUpdateMode.Never for each control but one, the lag exists for that one control so it doesn't seem to be the number of bound controls that causes the issue.

parameterTagRecord = new PETParameterTagRecord(TagID);
baseTagNameTB.DataBindings.Add("Text", parameterTagRecord, 
         "BaseTagName", true, DataSourceUpdateMode.OnPropertyChanged);

And an extract of my class:

public class PETParameterTagRecord : PETBaseObject, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
        private string _baseTagName = Constants.NullString;
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        public string BaseTagName
        {
            get { return _baseTagName; }
            set
            {
                _baseTagName = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("BaseTagName");
            }
        }

        private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String info)
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
            }
        }
}

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Have you been able to review an answer to this question? Do any explain / help? –  Andy Jul 18 '13 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

It shouldn't be that slow, but there's an option where you can have the textbox change on key press or on lost focus. Try setting it to lost focus. Also in your setter, be sure to check that _baseTagName != value before setting and raising the event. That will slow things up a bunch as well.

So, first try changing your binding like this:

baseTagNameTB.DataBindings.Add("Text", parameterTagRecord,  
         "BaseTagName", true, DataSourceUpdateMode.OnValidation);

See this MSDN link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.datasourceupdatemode.aspx. This means that instead of every keypress causing the new string value to be pushed into the property, it will only do so on Validation (which happens as part of the control losing focus).

Second, change your property implementation to match this:

public string BaseTagName   
{   
    get { return _baseTagName; }   
    set   
    {   
        if (_baseTagName != value) {
          _baseTagName = value;   
          NotifyPropertyChanged("BaseTagName");   
        }
    }   
}

Right now you're raising the event whether the property has actually changed or not. That is also detrimental to performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Andy, i am not sure where from this keypress or lost focus come in picture. I assume databinding does not care about these. Can you explain a bit more? –  Digvijay Feb 13 '12 at 2:35
    
It does. Look at the value used for datasourceupdatemode. –  Andy Feb 13 '12 at 4:46
    
Thanks Andy, this is something i never explored for normal binding scenarios worked just fine for me so far. I looked at the enumeration DataSourceIpdateMode however i still do not understand. Do you mean that RaisePropertyChanged be raised on LostFocus or KeyPress? –  Digvijay Feb 13 '12 at 9:07
    
@Digvijay I've updated my answer to include more detail. –  Andy Feb 13 '12 at 14:33
    
I had the same problem, changing the update mode from OnPropertyChanged to OnValidation helped: DataSourceUpdateMode.OnPropertyChanged => DataSourceUpdateMode.OnValidation –  Santhos Jul 11 '12 at 12:10

I ran into the same exact issue with BindingSource. This has has nothing to do with the update mode or notifications being fired too often (though indirectly, it does). The current implementation causes every single bound element to refresh whenever any property changes. So the reason OnValidation is less of an issue is obvious, it happens less frequently.

Fairly easy to check, too. Add two counters, increase each whenever a getter is accessed or NotifyProperChanged is called. In my case, with roughly 40 elements, I'd be at 1/40 after loading the form. Add a character in a textbox, suddenly at 2/80. Keeping the key pressed, my app stopped being responsive. Once it finally caught up, the count stood at something ridiculous like 50/2000. All from one single element changing.

I might be wrong, but I don't see how this makes sense or could be the desired implementation. Why would I want to update the whole form when one element changes, defeats the point of binding specific elements in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually that is the desired behavior; imagine you have a quantity and price text boxes, and a total text box which shows the total (quantity * price). I certainly expect to see total updated, and the current implementation does just that. The issue is the update mode, as OnPropertyChanged will cause an event FOR EACH KEYSTROKE the user makes; OnValidated only sends the event after the control loses focus. –  Andy Jul 17 '13 at 20:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.