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The short program below is intended to iterate over argv passed from the command line and exec each argument. This is not my homework, but rather it is something I am doing in preparation for doing my homework.

The first argument gets input from STDIN and STDOUT, and writes to a pipe. At the end of each iteration (except the last), the file descriptors are swapped, so that the pipe written to by the last exec will be read from by the next. In this way I intend, for example, for

./a.out /bin/pwd /usr/bin/wc 

to print out only the length of the working directory. Code follows

#include <stdio.h>                                                              
#include <unistd.h>                                                             
#include <sys/types.h>                                                          
#include <stdlib.h>                                                             
#include <string.h>                                                             

main(int argc, char * argv[]) {                                                 

  int i;
  int left[2], right[2], nbytes; /* arrays for file descriptors */

  /* pointers for swapping */
  int (* temp);
  int (* leftPipe) = left;                 
  int (* rightPipe) = right;

  pid_t childpid;                                                               
  char readbuffer[80];                                                          

  /* for the first iteration, leftPipe is STDIN */
  leftPipe[0] = STDIN_FILENO;
  leftPipe[1] = STDOUT_FILENO;

  for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) {                                                  

    /* reopen the right pipe (is this necessary?) */
    pipe(rightPipe);                                                            
    fprintf(stderr, "%d: %s\n", i, argv[i]);
    fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);                                                                                    
    if ((childpid = fork()) == -1) {                                            
      perror("fork");                                                           
      exit(1);                                                                  
    }                                                                           

    if (childpid == 0) {                                                        

      /* read input from the left */                                            
      close(leftPipe[1]); /* close output */                                    
      dup2(leftPipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);                                          
      close(leftPipe[0]); /* is this necessary? A tutorial seemed to be doing this */ 

      /* write output to the right */                                           
      close(rightPipe[0]); /* close input */                                    
      dup2(rightPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);                                        
      close(rightPipe[1]);                                                      

      execl(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);                                            
      exit(0);                                                                  
    }                                                                           

    wait();                                                                     

    /* on all but the last iteration, swap the pipes */
    if (i + 1 < argc) {              

      /* swap the pipes */                                                      
      fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);
      temp = leftPipe;                                                          
      leftPipe = rightPipe;                                                     
      rightPipe = temp;                                                         
      fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);
    }                                                                           
  }                                                                             

    /* read what was last written to the right pipe */                          
    close(rightPipe[1]); /* the receiving process closes 1 */                  

    nbytes = read(rightPipe[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));       
    readbuffer[nbytes] = 0;
    fprintf(stderr, "Received string: %s\n", readbuffer);                                

  return 0;                                                                     
}

UPDATE: in all of the below test cases I had originally used /bin/wc but which wc reveiled that the water closet is not at all where I thought. I am in the process of amending the results.

The output in a trivial case (./a.out /bin/pwd) is as expected:

1: /bin/pwd
Received string: /home/zeigfreid/Works/programmatical/Langara/spring_2012/OS/labs/lab02/play

The output from running this program with the first example (./a.out /bin/pwd /usr/bin/wc):

1: /bin/pwd
0 1 3 4
3 4 0 1
2: /bin/wc

At which point, the terminal hangs (maybe waiting on input).

As you can see, the string is not being received. What I imagine is that I have done something wrong above, either when swapping pointers, or that I don't understand unix file descriptors. My assignment, in the end, will be to interpret arbitrarily long pipes, and this is one of the ideas I had for solving the problem. I'm having trouble judging whether I am on the right track of barking up a tree. Do I understand unix file descriptors?

UPDATE:

Running it with /bin/ls as the second argument, I got the following result (the numbers are the file descriptors at various points):

1: /bin/pwd
0 1 3 4
0 1 3 4
3 4 0 1
2: /bin/ls
3 4 5 6
Received string: a.out
log
pipe2.c
play.c
@

There is still some garbage at the end there, but I am now more concerned that I do not understand pointers! These two commands are independent from each other though, they don't really make use of the pipe.

UPDATE: the garbage character was from not closing the string. Now I close it, and no garbage.

share|improve this question
    
I'd like to suggest changing all your printf(...) calls into fprintf(stderr,...). Mixing standard IO (printf(3)) with the lower-level routines (pipe(2), dup2(2), close(2)) is more trouble than it is worth. –  sarnold Feb 13 '12 at 0:51
    
Duly noted! I imagine splint would agree. –  Ziggy Feb 13 '12 at 0:55
    
You don't terminate the string before printing it, this explains the garbage. Try readbytes[nbytes] = 0 after the read. –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 0:58
    
So, it seems to me that after the swap, the process being executed is unable to read from the swapped pipe. If no swap is done, we can read from the pipe. If no read from the pipe is done by the second process, then it runs fine and puts output to a pipe. –  Ziggy Feb 13 '12 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The hanging is caused by the fact that the writing end of the "right" pipe isn't properly closed in the main process after forking. Because of this, wc will never stop reading (after all, the main process could still write stuff to the pipe!). It only stops reading after all copies of the file descriptor of the writing end have been closed.

Here is a fixed version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
  int i;
  int left[2], right[2], nbytes; /* arrays for file descriptors */

  /* pointers for swapping */
  int (* temp);
  int (* leftPipe) = left;
  int (* rightPipe) = right;

  pid_t childpid;
  char readbuffer[80];

  leftPipe[0] = STDIN_FILENO;
  // no need to assign leftPipe[1] here, it will not be used

  for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
    pipe(rightPipe); // create new pipe

    fprintf(stderr, "%d: %s\n", i, argv[i]);
    fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);
    if ((childpid = fork()) == -1) {
      perror("fork");
      exit(1);
    }

    if (childpid == 0) {
      // use the reading end of the left pipe as STDIN
      dup2(leftPipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);
      // use the writing end of the right pipe as STDOUT
      dup2(rightPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
      // close reading end of the right pipe
      close(rightPipe[0]);
      execl(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
      exit(0);
    }
    // IMPORTANT!! close writing end of the right pipe, otherwise
    // the program will hang (this is the main bug in your original
    // implementation)
    close(rightPipe[1]);

    // wait properly!
    waitpid(childpid, NULL, 0);

    /* on all but the last iteration, swap */
    if (i + 1 < argc) {
      fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);
      temp = leftPipe;
      leftPipe = rightPipe;
      rightPipe = temp;
      fprintf(stderr, "%d %d %d %d\n", leftPipe[0], leftPipe[1], rightPipe[0], rightPipe[1]);
    }
  }

  nbytes = read(rightPipe[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
  readbuffer[nbytes] = 0;
  fprintf(stderr, "Received string: %s\n", readbuffer);

  return 0;
}

Output:

 >> ./a.out /bin/ls /bin/cat /usr/bin/wc
1: /bin/ls
0 32767 3 4
0 32767 3 4
3 4 0 32767
2: /bin/cat
3 4 4 5
3 4 4 5
4 5 3 4
3: /usr/bin/wc
4 5 5 6
Received string:     266     294    4280

If you got specific questions about this solution, please let me know :) There also some other minor problems with your original code:

  • using pointers is unnecessary, we can just copy around the pipes (performance surely will not be a problem ;)
  • int is used instead of size_t
  • you didn't fix all the warning that would be presented to you when compiling with the -Wall flag

If you're interested, this is how I would have written it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  size_t i, nbytes;
  int left[2], right[2], tmp[2];
  pid_t childpid;
  char readbuffer[80];

  left[0] = STDIN_FILENO;

  for (i = 1; i < argc; ++i) {
    pipe(right);

    switch ((childpid = fork())) {
      case -1:
        perror("fork");
        exit(1);
      case 0:
        dup2(left[0], STDIN_FILENO);
        dup2(right[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        close(right[0]);
        execl(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
      default:
        close(right[1]);
        waitpid(childpid, NULL, 0);
    }

    if (i == argc - 1) break;
    memcpy(tmp,   left,  sizeof tmp);
    memcpy(left,  right, sizeof left);
    memcpy(right, tmp,   sizeof right);
  }

  nbytes = read(right[0], readbuffer, sizeof readbuffer);
  readbuffer[nbytes] = 0;
  fprintf(stderr, "Received string: %s\n", readbuffer);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! I wasn't compiling with -Wall, you're right. Normally I do, and I also fix splint -weak warnings, but this was just an experiment so I wasn't being as thorough. Glad to see the answer was something relatively small, rather than a categorical error as I had feared. So the answer is "yes" but I need more practice with the details. Thanks a lot your solution is very nice! –  Ziggy Feb 13 '12 at 6:04
    
@Ziggy: If it helped you, you are invited to accept this answer :) –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 14:10
    
I certainly will! I tend to :) –  Ziggy Feb 13 '12 at 20:13

To fix the garbage at the end of the output, add the following line before the final printf.

readbuffer[nbytes] = 0;

As to the hanging problem - I need a little more thought to fix that one. I am guessing it is something to do with plumbing and buffering.

share|improve this answer

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