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Is there a perceptable difference between using String.Format and string concatenation in Java?

I tend to use String.format but occasionally will slip and use a concat, I was wondering if one was better than the other.

The way I see it String.Format gives you more power in "formatting" the string and concatenation means you don't have to worry about accidentally putting in an extra %s or missing one out.

String.format is also shorter.

Which one is more readable depends on how your head works.

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10 Answers

up vote 92 down vote accepted

I'd suggest that it is better practice to use String.format. The main reason is that String.format can be more easily localised with text loaded from resource files whereas concatenation can't be localised without producing a new executable with different code for each language.

If you plan on your app being localisable you should also get into the habit of specifying argument positions for your format tokens as well:

"Hello %1$s the time is %2$t"

This can then be localised and have the name and time tokens swapped without requiring a recompile of the executable to account for the different ordering. With argument positions you can also re-use the same argument without passing it into the function twice:

String.format("Hello %1$s, your name is %1$s and the time is %2$t", name, time)
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30  
+1 did not know about argument ordering. –  Omar Kooheji May 29 '09 at 11:19
    
Can you point me to some documentation that talks about how to work with argument positions/order in Java (i.e., how to reference arguments by their position)? Thanks. –  markvgti Aug 20 '11 at 7:28
2  
Better late than never, random Java version: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/… –  Aksel Jan 17 '12 at 19:53
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Which one is more readable depends on how your head works.

You got your answer right there.

It's a matter of personal taste.

String concatenation is marginally faster, I suppose, but that should be negligible.

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2  
I agree. Thinking about performance differences here is mainly just premature optimisation - in the unlikely event that profiling shows there's a problem here, then worry about it. –  Jonik May 29 '09 at 11:01
1  
It's only really a matter of personal taste if the project is small and never intended to be internationalised in any meaningful sense. Otherwise String.format wins out over concatenation in every way. –  workmad3 May 29 '09 at 11:07
2  
I disagree. No matter how large the project is, you're hardly going to localise every string that's ever constructed within it. In other words, it depends on the situation (what are the strings used for). –  Jonik May 29 '09 at 11:13
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String.format() is more than just concatenating strings. For example, you can display numbers in a specific locale using String.format().

However, if you don't care about localisation, there is no functional difference. Maybe the one is faster than the other, but in most cases it will be negligible..

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I haven't done any specific benchmarks, but I would think that concatenation may be faster. String.format() creates a new Formatter which, in turn, creates a new StringBuilder (with a size of only 16 chars). That's a fair amount of overhead especially if you are formatting a longer string and StringBuilder keeps having to resize.

However, concatenation is less useful and harder to read. As always, it's worth doing a benchmark on your code to see which is better. The differences may be negligible in server app after your resource bundles, locales, etc are loaded in memory and the code is JITted.

Maybe as a best practice, it would be a good idea to create your own Formatter with a properly sized StringBuilder (Appendable) and Locale and use that if you have a lot of formatting to do.

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About performance:

 public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {      
  long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
  for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
      String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i*2;
  }
  long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond") ;

  start = System.currentTimeMillis();
     for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
         String s = String.format( "Hi %s; Hi to you %s",i, + i*2);
     }
     end = System.currentTimeMillis();
     System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");
   }

give tu me:

  • Concatenation = 265 millisecond
  • Format = 4141 millisecond

so Concatenation is mutch more faster than Formatting

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11  
It is certainly faster. But who's going to call it one million times per second? –  BalusC Jan 18 '10 at 17:02
1  
It depends to your requirements. I'have just write a very long time running String manipolation batch application ant it call string concatenation so many times! :) –  Icaro Jan 25 '10 at 8:34
4  
They are all bad practice. Use StringBuilder. –  Amir Raminfar Aug 11 '11 at 16:37
1  
StringBuilder is out of scope here (the OP question was about comparing String.format over string Concatenation) but have you performace data about String Builder? –  Icaro Jan 2 '12 at 10:46
23  
@AmirRaminar: The compiler converts "+" to calls to StringBuilder automatically. –  Martin Schröder Feb 23 '12 at 14:50
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You cannot compare String Concatenation and String.Format by the program above.

You may try this also be interchanging the position of using your String.Format and Concatenation in your code block like the below

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {      
  long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
   for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
         String s = String.format( "Hi %s; Hi to you %s",i, + i*2);
     }
     end = System.currentTimeMillis();
     System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

  start = System.currentTimeMillis();

for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
      String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i*2;
  }
  long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond") ;


   }

You will be surprised to see that Format works faster here. This is since the intial objects created might not be released and there can be an issue with memory allocation and thereby the performance.

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2  
have you tried your code? Concatenation is always ten time faster –  Icaro Nov 9 '11 at 17:59
    
I am guessing he hasn't since he is using end before he declares it.. –  MrCeeJ Apr 1 at 8:40
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There could be a perceptible difference.

String.format is quite complex and uses a regular expression underneath, so don't make it a habit to use it everywhere, but only where you need it.

StringBuilder would be an order of magnitude faster (as someone here already pointed out).

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Since there is discussion about performance I figured I'd add in a comparison that included StringBuilder. It is in fact faster than the concat and, naturally the String.format option.

To make this a sort of apples to apples comparison I instantiate a new StringBuilder in the loop rather than outside (this is actually faster than doing just one instantiation most likely due to the overhead of re-allocating space for the looping append at the end of one builder).

    String formatString = "Hi %s; Hi to you %s";

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = String.format(formatString, i, +i * 2);
    }

    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
    log.info("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i * 2;
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    log.info("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        StringBuilder bldString = new StringBuilder("Hi ");
        bldString.append(i).append("; Hi to you ").append(i * 2);
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    log.info("String Builder = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,058 INFO [TestMain] - Format = 1416 millisecond
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,190 INFO [TestMain] - Concatenation = 134 millisecond
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,313 INFO [TestMain] - String Builder = 117 millisecond
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5  
The StringBuilder test doesn't call toString(), so it isn't a fair comparison. I suspect you'll find it's within measurement error of the performance of concatenation if you fix that bug. –  Jamey Sharp Oct 31 '12 at 2:33
    
Hi Jamey, I'm afraid I'm not following you here, can you please elaborate? I don't think any of the tests explicitly call toString() so I'm not sure why I should add that for comparions sake; I think I am missing something here. - Trip –  Tech Trip Nov 14 '13 at 18:47
5  
In the concatenation and format tests, you asked for a String. The StringBuilder test, to be fair, needs a final step that turns the StringBuilder's contents into a String. You do that by calling bldString.toString(). I hope that explains it? –  Jamey Sharp Nov 21 '13 at 2:47
3  
Jamey Sharp is exactly right. Invoking bldString.toString() is about the same if not slower than string concatenation. –  Akos Cz Dec 3 '13 at 20:18
    
It is still pretty fast (see below for test with .toString() added, and this is only for 3 concatenations. I am pretty sure that for 4 or more the string builder would be considerably faster, after all that is what it was designed for :) –  MrCeeJ Apr 1 at 8:48
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One problem with .format is that you loose static type safety: You can have not enough arguments for your format, and you can have the wrong types for the format specifiers - both leading to an IllegalFormatException in runtime, so you might be ending up with logging code that breaks production.

In contrast the arguments to + can be tested by the compiler.

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Here's the same test as above with the modification of calling the toString() method on the StringBuilder. The results below show that the StringBuilder approach is just a bit slower than String concatenation using the + operator.

file: StringTest.java

class StringTest {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    String formatString = "Hi %s; Hi to you %s";

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = String.format(formatString, i, +i * 2);
    }

    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i * 2;
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        StringBuilder bldString = new StringBuilder("Hi ");
        bldString.append(i).append("Hi to you ").append(i * 2).toString();
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("String Builder = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

  }
}

Shell Commands : (compile and run StringTest 5 times)

> javac StringTest.java
> sh -c "for i in \$(seq 1 5); do echo \"Run \${i}\"; java StringTest; done"

Results :

Run 1
Format = 1290 millisecond
Concatenation = 115 millisecond
String Builder = 130 millisecond

Run 2
Format = 1265 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 126 millisecond

Run 3
Format = 1303 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 127 millisecond

Run 4
Format = 1297 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 127 millisecond

Run 5
Format = 1270 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 126 millisecond
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