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public class CarSpecs
{
  public String CarName { get; set; }

  public String CarMaker { get; set; }

  public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }
}

This is a list and I am trying to figure out an efficient way to sort this list List CarList, containing 6(or any integer amount) Cars, by the Car Make Date. I was going to do Bubble sort, but will that work? Any Help?

Thanks

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2  
(off-topic) Autoproperties anyone? –  Peter Lillevold May 29 '09 at 11:33
2  
@Peter Lillevold - that was my VERY FIRST THOUGHT too. I haven't written a "normal" property (backed by a local variable that I wrote) in a loooong time. (Just so mike knows: "public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }" is legal in C# 3.0) –  Pwninstein May 29 '09 at 11:39
1  
Hm, i hit Alt-Enter in the editor to have ReSharper convert to autoproperty ... but nothing happened. ohwell, is it considered rude to edit code samples like this? though a bit risky in this instance since we're not sure if @Mike is using C# 3.0 or not.. –  Peter Lillevold May 29 '09 at 11:55
    
@Peter - I'd probably just leave his code sample as-is (as the possibility still stands that he's not using 3.0). I suppose he can change it if he decides he wants to use automatic properties. I'll give you an "A" for effort, though! –  Pwninstein May 29 '09 at 12:52

9 Answers 9

The List<T> class makes this trivial for you, since it contains a Sort method. (It uses the QuickSort algorithm, not Bubble Sort, which is typically better anyway.) Even better, it has an overload that takes a Comparison<T> argument, which means you can pass a lambda expression and make things very simple indeed.

Try this:

CarList.Sort((x, y) => DateTime.Compare(x.CreationDate, y.CreationDate));
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I think he want's to sort, first by Car, then by Make, then by Date... –  Eoin Campbell May 29 '09 at 11:20
    
@Eoin: It's slightly ambiguous, I admit. I still believe he meant "Car Make Date" as one property, referring to CreationDate. –  Noldorin May 29 '09 at 11:21
2  
+1 from for using lambda expressions! –  Egil Hansen May 29 '09 at 11:25
1  
How to compare an int datatype through this method? –  Faraz Ahmad Feb 16 '14 at 15:42
    
yeah i would like to know that too :) how do you compare an int datatype with this? –  Dendei Jun 27 '14 at 7:47

You could use LINQ:

listOfCars.OrderBy(x => x.CreationDate);

EDIT: With this approach, its easy to add on more sort columns:

listOfCars.OrderBy(x => x.CreationDate).ThenBy(x => x.Make).ThenBy(x => x.Whatever);
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3  
Yeah, this will do the job too. It will however have worse performance than using List.Sort, since it's based around LINQ (i.e. IEnumerable<T> objects), though from the original question that wouldn't seem to be a big deal. The only real difference is that this returns a new object (which you then have to convert to a list using ToList()), whereas List.Sort performs the sort on the current instance. –  Noldorin May 29 '09 at 11:17
    
@Noldorin. Yeah, your suggestion of using List.Sort(comparisson) could be quicker... –  Arjan Einbu May 29 '09 at 11:21
    
Thanks, I didn't know about ThenBy. –  Greg Fleming Jul 7 '11 at 15:56
1  
this is faster myList.Sort((x, y) => DateTime.Compare(x.Created, y.Created)); –  rochasdv Feb 27 at 19:19

The best approach is to implement either IComparable or IComparable<T>, and then call List<T>.Sort(). This will do all the hard work of sorting for you.

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2  
+1 to counter the pointless -1 that someone else did. Nothing wrong with this suggestion. –  tomfanning May 29 '09 at 11:16
2  
A code example would've been nice though. –  Peter Feb 25 '14 at 9:39

Another option would be to use a custom comparer:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace Yournamespace
{
   class CarNameComparer : IComparer<Car>
   {
      #region IComparer<Car> Members

      public int Compare(Car car1, Car car2)
      {
         int returnValue = 1;
         if (car1 != null && car2 == null)
         {
            returnValue = 0;
         }
         else if (car1 == null && car2 != null)
         {
            returnValue = 0;
         }
         else if (car1 != null && car2 != null)
         {
            if (car1.CreationDate.Equals(car2.CreationDate))
            {
               returnValue = car1.Name.CompareTo(car2.Name);
            }
            else
            {
               returnValue = car2.CreationDate.CompareTo(car1.CreationDate);
            }
         }
         return returnValue;
      }

      #endregion
   }
}

which you call like this:

yourCarlist.Sort(new CarNameComparer());

Note: I didn't compile this code so you might have to remove typo's

Edit: modified it so the comparer compares on creationdate as requested in question.

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Nothing wrong with this, but far more than you need! –  Noldorin May 29 '09 at 11:22
    
Modified my answer to match your comment. It is way to go to have full control over the sorting. But that may be too much in this case :-) –  Peter May 29 '09 at 12:41
    
It's a good answer anyways since it is translatable to other languages as well. When you use linq or lambda expressions then you trap yourself in C#. (although I'm very tempted no to do much right now and just use the 1 line of lambda :) –  Bitterblue Jun 17 '14 at 11:30

I would just use the build in List.Sort method. It uses the QuickSort algorithm which on average runs in O(n log n).

This code should work for you, I change your properties to auto-properties, and defined a static CompareCarSpecs method that just uses the already existing DateTime.CompareTo method.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<CarSpecs> cars = new List<CarSpecs>();
        cars.Sort(CarSpecs.CompareCarSpecs);
    }
}

public class CarSpecs
{
    public string CarName { get; set; }
    public string CarMaker { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public static int CompareCarSpecs(CarSpecs x, CarSpecs y)
    {
        return x.CreationDate.CompareTo(y.CreationDate);
    }
}

Hope this helps.

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This is a good solution if you don't have C# 3.0 available (i.e. no lambdas). –  Noldorin May 29 '09 at 11:27

Putting some of the pieces mentioned here together. This compiles and works in C# 4.x and VS2010. I tested with a WinForm. So add the method to the WinForm Main(). You will need the System.Linq and System.Generic.Collections assemblies at least.

    private void SortCars()
    {
        List<CarSpecs> cars = new List<CarSpecs>();
        List<CarSpecs> carsSorted = new List<CarSpecs>();

        cars.Add(new CarSpecs
        {
            CarName = "Y50",
            CarMaker = "Ford",
            CreationDate = new DateTime(2011, 4, 1),
        });

        cars.Add(new CarSpecs
        {
            CarName = "X25",
            CarMaker = "Volvo",
            CreationDate = new DateTime(2012, 3, 1),
        });

        cars.Add(new CarSpecs
        {
            CarName = "Z75",
            CarMaker = "Datsun",
            CreationDate = new DateTime(2010, 5, 1),
        });

        //More Comprehensive if needed  
        //cars.OrderBy(x => x.CreationDate).ThenBy(x => x.CarMaker).ThenBy(x => x.CarName);

        carsSorted.AddRange(cars.OrderBy(x => x.CreationDate));

        foreach (CarSpecs caritm in carsSorted)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Name: " +caritm.CarName 
                + "\r\nMaker: " +caritm.CarMaker
                + "\r\nCreationDate: " +caritm.CreationDate);
        }
    }
}

public class CarSpecs
{
    public string CarName { get; set; }
    public string CarMaker { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }
} 
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If you're after an efficient way of sorting, I'd advise against using bubble sort and go for a quick sort instead. This page provides a rather good explanation of the algorithm:

http://www.devhood.com/Tutorials/tutorial_details.aspx?tutorial_id=574

Best of luck!

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I would avoid writing my own sorting algorithm, but if you are going to anyway, have a look at http://www.sorting-algorithms.com/ for some comparrisons of different sorting algorithms...

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If you are using 2.0, the following discussion may be useful: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/289010/c-list-sort-by-x-then-y

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