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As part of an ongoing class project, we were asked to implement Maps for better object linking.

In short, we currently have four arraylists which hold objects

// Array Lists used for sorting.
private static ArrayList<Party> partyList = new ArrayList<Party>();
private static ArrayList<Creature> creatureList = new ArrayList<Creature>();
private static ArrayList<Treasure> treasureList = new ArrayList<Treasure>();
private static ArrayList<Artifact> artifactList = new ArrayList<Artifact>();

Each class has their own fields (ie, Party has "index","name", Creature has "index", "name", "age", height", etc...but they all have a unique index)

This week we are to implement hashmaps, where the key of an object, is its index.

so, as an exmaple:

creatureMap.put(creature.index, creature)
...

Our program also allows searching. So i understand that now when we search by an index, we just search the appropriate hashmap for the index we want, and work with the object that is its value.

However, our program also allows the user to search by name, height, weight, etc. So, how are hashmaps being used efficiently here if it only helps when searching by index? What happens if i want to search a creature by name? I would have to loop through every value in the hashmap, look at its 'name' field..which is exactly what i am doing with the arraylist.

Our professor said this when someone asked a similar question:

The idea is that in the first project, the simple approach was to insert all items into array lists and when one needed to link a creature to a party, or an item to a creature, one would have to search the ArrayList linearly until the index of the item was found. This is O(n) operation if the ArrayList is not sorted, and an O(log n) operation if the list is sorted, but the sorting is typically O(n*n) or O(n log n) depending on the sorting operation used.

This week, I am asking you to implement an O(1) searching system based on a map data structure. Thus, we should use the index of a item as its key to generate the links. This is used once during processing of the input file.

Thus, I am not sure i am understanding the concept of Maps / key-value pairs correctly.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your understanding is correct: if your key is an index, you can only use the map to efficiently lookup by index. If you wanted to search by name, then you would have to key on the name.

I'm not too sure on what your professor meant by this:

Thus, we should use the index of a item as its key to generate the links.

(I think he refers to linking objects by index, as in "link a creature to a party" - maybe he did not refer to the use of hashmaps for searching)

On a side note, it's good practice to declare variables based on interfaces rather than concrete types. In your example, you should define your list fields as List instead of ArrayList:

private static List<Party> partyList = new ArrayList<Party>();
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Running through your questions (and statements) in order....

So i understand that now when we search by an index, we just search the appropriate hashmap for the index we want, and work with the object that is its value.

That is correct.

However, our program also allows the user to search by name, height, weight, etc. So, how are hashmaps being used efficiently here if it only helps when searching by index?

If your hashmap is only storing by index then you are correct that it does not help you search by any other field. You could create a map for those fields also, but I don't think that's what your professor want (see below)

What happens if i want to search a creature by name? I would have to loop through every value in the hashmap, look at its 'name' field..which is exactly what i am doing with the arraylist.

Yes, if you needed to search by name, then you would use the values() method and iterate through that, checking each item.

when one needed to link a creature to a party, or an item to a creature, one would have to search the ArrayList linearly until the index of the item was found
...
Thus, we should use the index of a item as its key to generate the links. This is used once during processing of the input file.

This suggests to me that there is another part of the assignment - something to do with reading input from a file, and linking parties, creatures and items together.

I assume that input file for the parties refers to the creatures by index (and likewise for the creatures referring to items).
It is that linkage that the professor wants you to speed up by using these hashmaps.
I don't think he is trying to get you to change the way other sorts of searching works

(Obviously this is a guess since I don't know what the assignment actually says)

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Indeed. the input file contains lines that we create our objects from. for example (p : 001 : weekend warriors) that line tells us to create a party object, its index is 001, and its name is weekend warriors. Similarly, a creature will be like that, but it will also have another index, which is the party it belongs to.(c : 250 : conan : 001) –  katsh Feb 13 '12 at 2:28
2  
Right. So with the List version of the code, you have to iterate through the list in order to find party #001, which makes you file reading code relatively slow (when you have a lot of parties to loop through). The map version will speed up the file reading code by doing an index [ O(1) ] lookup instead of an iterative [ O(n) ] lookup. –  Tim Feb 13 '12 at 2:34
    
Thanks. Wish i could accept two answers =| –  katsh Feb 13 '12 at 2:37

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