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So the problem I'm having is I have a function which uses a variable in a closure and when testing it it returns a reference to the variable in it's scope. My code looks similar to the following:

var app = function() {
    var theString = "";

    //Appends ztvars onto the url passed into the function
    var appendString = function(url) {            
        if (theString.length === 0) {
            return url;
        }

        return url+theString;   
    };

    //Used for testing, returns the function appendPageVars
    this.returnFunctions = function() {
        return { appendString: appendString };
    }
}

And the testing code using QUnit looks like the following:

var theApp = new app();
appFunctions = theApp.returnFunctions();
test('appendString()', function() {
    var theString = "TestString";
    var theUrl = "http://www.test.com";
    equals(appFunctions.appendString(testUrl), theUrl+theString, "Checking the string appended to the url"); //Fails
});

The problem is that even when passing the function back to the test the appendString function still holds a reference to the theString defined inside the app scope.

I've managed to get around this problem by creating a clone of the function using eval rather than using it directly like so:

var theApp = new app();
appFunctions = theApp.returnFunctions();
test('appendString()', function() {
    var theString = "TestString";
    var theUrl = "http://www.test.com";
    eval("var appendString = "+appFunctions.appendString.toString());
    equals(appendString(testUrl), theUrl+theString, "Checking the string appended to the url"); //Passes
});

However I've always been taught to avoid eval and so I was wondering is there a better way to do this? Am I missing something here, or is this how it's supposed to be done?

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1  
This is a syntax error: this.returnFunctions() { –  Šime Vidas Feb 13 '12 at 3:17
    
Well, that's just how JavaScript works. It has static scoping. I'm not sure that it's possible to simulate dynamic scoping when executing functions... –  Šime Vidas Feb 13 '12 at 3:20
    
@ŠimeVidas - Thanks the syntax error has been fixed. So there's no better way to do this? –  Tim Feb 13 '12 at 3:28
    
I'm not even sure that there exists another way to do it. –  Šime Vidas Feb 13 '12 at 3:39
    
The "avoid eval" thing gets over-emphasized in order to prevent people from doing dangerous things with it. If you only need it for your unit tests it's fine. –  Kevin Ennis Feb 13 '12 at 3:57

2 Answers 2

What you need is dependency injection when you provide the object with a mock object.

var App = function (theString) {
  theString = theString || ''; // optional argument

  var appendString = function (str) {
    return theString + str;
  };
  this.returnFunctions = function () {
    return { appendString: appendString };
  };
};

test('appendString()', function () {
  var app = new App('TestString');
  var fns = app.returnFunctions();
  equals(fns.appendString('test'), 'TestStringtest', ...);
});
share|improve this answer
    
In the actual code the function App has over 50 different functions (not just appendString) This was just a simplified example. It also can't be changed for the sake of a unit test. Although this is a workaround it doesn't solve the original problem, which is that when unit testing the function still references it's original values from it's original closure. –  Tim Feb 22 '12 at 22:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So as far as I can tell the answer is to use Eval to recreate the function (as per my example). Although eval is taught to be avoided in this case it appears to be the right thing to do. Thanks for your help everyone!

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