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With respect to the following code segment, I would like to know whether my understanding on several issues are correct?

1) In the structure of $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}} , “in1”, “tra1”, and “data” all represent specific keys at different levels of hash structures.

2) Does $#{$model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}}represent an array?

3) What does my @cus = sort keys %cus; aim to do? Are the “cus” at the right side and the “cus” at the left side the same thing?

my %cus = ();
for my $i ( 0 .. $#{$model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}})
{
  foreach  my $cu (keys %{$model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}->[$i]->{concept}}
   {
       $cus{$cu} = 1;
   }
 }
my  @cus = sort keys %cus;
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Fixed mismatched brakets $#(...} and %(...} –  ikegami Feb 13 '12 at 3:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

1)

They are keys to different hashes, yes.

  • in1 is used as the key to the hash referenced by $model.
  • tra1 is used as the key to the hash referenced by $model->{in1}.
  • data is used as the key to the hash referenced by $model->{in1}->{tra1}.

2)

  • $#a returns the last index of array @a.

so

  • $#{ $ref } (or $#$ref for short) returns the last index of @{ $ref } (or @$ref for short), the array referenced by $ref.

so

  • $#{ $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data} } returns the last index of @{ $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data} }, the array referenced by $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}.

3)

The statement sorts the keys of the hash %cus and places them in array @cus. No, %cus and @cus aren't the same variable.

"4")

The code can be simplified to:

my %cus;
my $data = $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data};
for my $i (0 .. $#$data) {
   for my $cu (keys %{ $data->[$i]->{concept} }) {
      ++$cus{$cu};
   }
}

my @cus = sort keys %cus;

Or even:

my %cus;
for my $data_item (@{ $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data} }) {
   for my $cu (keys %{ $data_item->{concept} }) {
      ++$cus{$cu};
   }
}

my @cus = sort keys %cus;
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  1. Yes, you've got nested hashes three deep.

  2. Yes, the $#{...} part means "the largest index of the enclosed array". You also know that ...->{data} is a (reference to an) array because of the ->{data}->[$i] on the next line.

  3. @cus and %cus are two different variables, unrelated.

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In the structure of $model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}} , “in1”, “tra1”, and “data” all represent specific keys at different levels of hash structures.

Yes. If that is not the case, there will be an error.

Does $#($model->{in1}->{tra1}->{data}} represent an array?

Not quite. It is the number of elements in an array (so, yes, the data in the hash should be an array).

What does my @cus = sort keys %cus; aim to do?

It takes all the keys from the hash table %cus and sorts them alphabetically into a new array @cus.

Are the “cus” at the right side and the “cus” at the left side the same thing?

No. In Perl $cus, @cus and %cus are three different variables. The prefix denotes the type.

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"It is the number of elements in an array" Not quite it's the index of the last element in the array (which will usually be one less than than the number of elements). –  Dave Cross Feb 13 '12 at 15:59

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