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Can anyone help me figure out how to do this, it would be much appreciated.

example

block of            //delete
non-important text  //delete

important text      //keep
more important text //keep
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1  
Is the blank line empty, or can it contain whitespace? –  Beta Feb 13 '12 at 3:38

4 Answers 4

sed '1,/^$/d' file

or

awk '!$0{f=1;next}f{print}' file

Output

$ sed '1,/^$/d' <<< $'block of\nnon-important text\n\nimportant text\nmore important text'
important text
more important text

$ awk '!$0{f=1;next}f{print}' <<< $'block of\nnon-important text\n\nimportant text\nmore important text'
important text
more important text
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Yep, sed '1,/^$/d' file was exactly what i was looking for. Thanks –  user1205984 Feb 13 '12 at 3:48

If the blank line is empty, this'll do it:

sed '1,/^$/d' filename
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Yes, this is exactly what i needed thanks –  user1205984 Feb 13 '12 at 3:47
    
this is missing the d command –  SiegeX Feb 13 '12 at 18:47
    
@SiegeX, how did I miss that? Thanks. –  Beta Feb 13 '12 at 19:40

with awk:

awk "BEGIN { x = 0 } /^$/ { x = 1} { if (x == 2) { print } ; if (x == 1) { x = 2 } }" filename
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Wouldn't it be simpler to do something like: awk '{if (initblock) print} /^$/ { initblock=1 }' (which actually can be all on one line). The initblock variable is initially zero. The if action occurs on all lines, printing the input if initblock is not zero. The /^$/ pattern matches the empty line and sets initblock=1 (meaning the initial block of lines to be deleted has been seen, and all remaining input will be passed through). The pattern test occurs after the print so that the initial blank line is not printed. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 13 '12 at 5:13

Another option with grep (working on lines)

grep -v PATTERN filename > newfilename

For example:

filename has the following lines:

this is not implicated but important text
this is not important text
this is important text he says
not important text he says
not this it is more important text

A filter of:

grep -v "not imp" filename > newfilename

would create newfilename with the following 3 lines:

this is not implicated but important text
this is important text he says
not this it is more important text

You would have to choose a PATTERN that would uniquely identify the lines you are trying to remove. If you use a PATTERN of "important text", it would match all of the lines while "not imp" only matches the lines that have the words "not imp" in them. Use egrep (or grep -E) for regexp filters if you want more flexibility in pattern matching.

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