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In an iOS application, I have a struct that looks like this

typedef struct _Pixel {
  signed char r;
  signed char g;
  signed char b;
} Pixel;

In my code, I allocate an array of these with calloc:

Pixel* buff = calloc(width * height, sizeof(Pixel));

Now, this works perfectly in the simulator, but on the device, if I try to access buff[width * height - 1] (i.e. the last element in buff), I get an EXC_BAD_ACCESS.

This didn't make sense to me, so after a few hours of debugging, I wondered if it was some kind of alignment issue, so on a whim I tried:

typedef struct _Pixel {
  signed char r;
  signed char g;
  signed char b;
  signed char padding;
} Pixel;

making the size of Pixel a power of two.

This fixes the EXC_BAD_ACCESS, but it's awfully weird. Does anyone have any insight into what's going on here? Am I just masking the underlying problem by padding the struct or can alignment really cause a bad access (I thought alignment only had an effect on performance, not correctness).

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Hey Bill two things. Since SO does not let me edit one character,you got a typo in calloc. You are missing a parentheses in the end. As for your main problem, this sort of thing usually happens if you Either realloacate the buff somewhere else, or in one of the times you access it, you happen to accidentally go off-index. Do you do anything else to buff before trying to access the last element? –  Lefteris Feb 13 '12 at 3:46
    
check your values of width and height again...!!! –  Inder Kumar Rathore Feb 13 '12 at 4:04
    
This is code that has worked for months - the only difference is that I changed the type of the struct members from CGFloat to signed bytes. So width and height are not the problem - it's something to do with the layout of the struct. –  Bill Feb 13 '12 at 4:08
    
Can you include the line you use to access it? Are you trying to set the entire pixel, or just a field in it? –  Steven Fisher Feb 13 '12 at 4:17

2 Answers 2

EXC_BAD_ACCESS is related to alignment. Unlike x86, ARM requires memory access aligned to certain boundary.

To control alignment, use #pragma push, #pragma pack(n) and #pragma pop around.

See http://tedlogan.com/techblog2.html

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2  
He did not ask how to control alignment. He asked if anyone knows why without the padding it causes EXC_BAD_ACCESS in the first place –  Lefteris Feb 13 '12 at 4:05
    
Mis-alignment is the cause of EXC_BAD_ACCESS, on ARM. Do not take the behaviors on x86 for granted. –  ZhangChn Feb 13 '12 at 4:15
    
it is strange, since he is accessing bytes, which should not suffer from alignment exceptions. Maybe the struct gets passed to a part of the application which was not recompiled after the struct change? –  Willem Hengeveld Feb 14 '12 at 15:53

It is the problem of alignment. The minimum structure alignment size is 4 bytes and it will vary according to the datatype declaration in structure (eg. double).Here if you print the size of single block, it will print 3 instead of 4. But if you print the size of your structure, it will print 4 because of the minimum alignment size.

Assume if you also have an 'int' element in the structure, then both the size of single block and structure will be 8. This is because of compiler forced allocate padding byte in between the chars and the int. For example

typedef struct {

signed char r;
signed char g;
signed char b;
}MyType;

MyType *type = (MyType *)calloc(20, sizeof(MyType));
printf("size: %ld", sizeof(MyType));
printf("size: %ld", sizeof(type[0]));

The first printf statement will print 4 and the second will print 3. Because the default structure alignment size is 4 bytes and actual allocation is 3 bytes. Now just add one int type in to the same structure.

typedef struct {

signed char r;
signed char g;
signed char b;

int i;           // New int element added here
}MyType;

MyType *type = (MyType *)calloc(20, sizeof(MyType));
printf("size: %ld", sizeof(MyType));
printf("size: %ld", sizeof(type[0]));

Here both printf statements will print 8. Because compiler forced to allocate a byte in between char and the int to just keep the alignment in to multiples of four. Then the structure will look like as given below,

typedef struct {

signed char r;
signed char g;
signed char b;

char padding;    // Padding byte allocated to keep alignment.

int i;
}MyType;

So you have to add a padding byte in your structure to keep the alignment because of the actual allocation is 3 bytes.

The structure allocation size also will vary according to the position of different datatype declarations inside the structure.

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