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I'm just trying to check if a string is equal to "%2B", and if it does I change it to "+". The problem lies in comparison.

if ($lastItem == "%2B"){
   $lastItem = "+";
}

When $lastItem is something completely different (like "hello"), it will still go into the statement. I've been wracking my brain and I just can't tell where I've gone wrong. Does %2B have some special meaning? I'm very new to perl.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to use eq when comparing strings, or perl will try to convert the string to a number (which will be 0), and you will find such oddities as "a" == 0 to evaluate true. And when comparing two strings, you will of course effectively get if (0 == 0), which is the problem you are describing.

if ($lastItem eq "%2B") {

It is important to note that if you had used use warnings, this problem would have been easier to spot, as this one-liner will demonstrate:

$ perl -wE 'say "yes" if ("foo" == "bar")'
Argument "bar" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at -e line 1.
Argument "foo" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at -e line 1.
yes
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oh haha I feel like an idiot. Thank you –  user1126345 Feb 13 '12 at 5:27
1  
@user1126345 It's a common mistake. You're welcome. –  TLP Feb 13 '12 at 5:33
    
@user1126345 If you feel this answered your question, you can click the check mark to the left to "accept" it. –  TLP Feb 13 '12 at 5:37
    
Oh sure thing, yeah I'm still new here. Thanks again –  user1126345 Feb 13 '12 at 5:57

I think you really want the following:

use URI::Escape qw( uri_unescape );

my $unescaped_last_item = uri_unescape($escaped_last_item);

URI::Escape

Please use use strict; use warnings;!

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Another example where turning on use warnings would have made it simpler to work out what was wrong.

$ perl -Mwarnings -e'$l = "x"; if ($l == "%2B") { print "match\n" }'
Argument "%2B" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at -e line 1.
Argument "x" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at -e line 1.
match
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