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Now I want to provide a function in our system to modify the system hosts file in Linux, but the user who runs the system is not root nor in root group. Is there a way to grant a user the modification right on system hosts files? (without add this user into root)

Thanks.

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not programming related – Juri Glass Feb 13 '12 at 7:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To set user as sudoer (user with more rights) you must edit /etc/sudoers. Type "sudo nano /etc/sudoers" and add your user with granted permition!

You need to add the following line to the sudoers file - for example:

user ALL=/etc/hosts --user has right to modify hosts file

where user needs to be changed to real username of that user.

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Use visudo if you're editing your sudoers file, since it will do syntax-checking and prevent you from accidentally ruining your sudoers file (as I have done in the past). – nickgrim Feb 13 '12 at 14:13
    
I set as you said, but I still can not save the hosts file in command line. It still prompt that it is read-only. I think sudo can grant user on this file, but some other place let me open this file in just read-only mode. – Mavlarn Feb 15 '12 at 7:44
    
You should use chmod command to give permssion to write to file – mdakic Feb 16 '12 at 9:28

Your safest bet is to write a program that modifies the file in a controlled way and then grant the permission to run that program to the selected users using sudo.

Or you could also use ACLs: setfacl/getfacl.

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And how would they go about doing this in this context? – Jimbo Jul 2 '15 at 13:54

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