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I have a class first where $name is set to 'bob'. In the child class, I set $name to 'Karen' but it doesn't work.

In my echo statements, the 1st one says "bob" instead of 'Karen'. The second one, using a child class method, works though.

Why is this behavior?

class First {

    public $name;

    public function __construct() {

        $this->name = 'bob';
    }
}

class Third extends First {

    public $name = 'Karen';
    public function set_name ($name) {
        $this->name = $name;
    }
}

$instance_of_third = new Third;
$third_name = $instance_of_third->name;

echo "<br />We're looking for Karen: $third_name<br />";
// $third_name here is 'bob' from parent class

$instance_of_third->set_name("Karen");
$third_name = $instance_of_third->name;
// $third_name here is 'Karen' only after using set_name()
echo "<br />We're looking for Karen: $third_name<br />";

EDIT: I added 2 lines showing what the output was exactly.

Even though $name is explicitly set to 'Karen' in child class, it shows as 'bob' unless the set_name() function is used to change it.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because your Third does not have it's own constructor, it will inherit the constructor from First. Inheritance creates an behaves-as relationship between supertype and subtype.

So when you create a new instance of Third, the instance will have a $name property of 'Karen', but then the inherited constructor will get called. And that sets the name to Bob. If you don't want that behavior in the subtype, you have to add an empty constructor to Third, e.g.

class Third extends First
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // prevents parent First::__construct
    }
}

demo

An alternative would be to remove the ctor (or at least not set $name in it) and preset the $name property in the parent to Bob. Then your initial idea would work, e.g.

class First
{
    public $name = 'Bob';
}

class Third extends First
{
    public $name = 'Karen';
}

demo

Please check the chapters on Inheritance and Visibility in the PHP Manual:

share|improve this answer
    
What's strange about it is I would expect that if someone wanted to extend a class and change one of the properties they could just do it explicitly like I did instead of having to write a bunch of constructor code. –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 8:42
1  
@ButtleButkus see my update. You can do that. You just have to understand that the sequence of initializing a new instance is: new Foo -> creates new instance of Foo with default properties -> then automatically invokes __construct on that instance to do additional initialization. –  Gordon Feb 13 '12 at 8:53

When you create a object of class, then constructor is called.

So constructor of parent class is over writing the value of $name in your case.

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$name is set in the child class. Your answer seems to say that the constructor is called first, but that's not what's happening. It looks like the $name gets set first then gets overwritten by constructor... ? –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 8:36
    
No, variable is initialized first, then constructor is called –  Gaurav Feb 13 '12 at 8:38
    
Hmm, that's weird. Thank you. –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 8:40

Because the constructor is called after fields are initialized , so it overrides your $name field.

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That does seem to be what is happening, but isn't this weird? If you explicitly set the value in a child class don't you assume that's the value you'll get? Or do you use a child class constructor to change it? –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 8:40
    
You'll get that value if you don't change it in a method , like constructors. Simply say your code does: 1) create an object with name = 'Karen'; 2) new calls the constructor and change it to 'Bob'; 3) the object is assigned to a variable. –  meze Feb 13 '12 at 8:43

The constructor overrides the default value. (Generally because it's called after the default value instantiation), a more robust way would be something like so:

class First {
    public $name;
    public function __construct($name) {
        $this->name = $name;
    }
}

Then call it by:

$first_instance = new First("Bob");

It will also extend to the Third class.

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The interpreter most likely reads from top to bottom, just like us.

In the first example, you set the public variable to Karen, however since the child class inherits the constructor of the first class, "Bob" will be set.

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Hmm, reading from top to bottom I would think you would instantiate the child class with its inherited value of 'bob', then find it set to 'Karen' in the child class and overwrite 'bob'. –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 8:38
    
Yes, but when the class is instantiated, the constructor is called, setting it to Bob. :) –  Jeff Feb 13 '12 at 8:51

Try declaring the $name as static. and access it via Third::$name for example.

class First {

    public static $name;

    public function __construct() {

        self::$name = 'bob';
    }

    // edit late static binding
    public function getName() {
       return static::$name;
    }


}

class Third extends First {

    public static $name = 'karen';

}

$instance_of_third = new Third();
//$third_name = $instance_of_third::$name;
$third_name = $instance_of_third->getName();    

echo "<br />We're looking for Karen: $third_name<br />";
share|improve this answer
    
that doesnt solve the OP's problem. Or rather, it does, but it no longer addresses the problem at the core. OP has trouble understanding how inheritance works in PHP. –  Gordon Feb 13 '12 at 8:58
    
So, static variables can be overridden by simple assignment. Your code works, but it's strange that Dreamweaver highlights an error at "$third_name = $instance_of_third::$name;" –  Buttle Butkus Feb 13 '12 at 9:10
    
i have edited the example. you could also declare a function called getName() in the parent class. The getName returns the name associated with the class. This works in php 5.3 and is called late static binding. As an example : $first = new First(); $first->getName() would return Bob etc. –  busypeoples Feb 13 '12 at 9:19

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