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I have a code like this:

try
{
    using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
        some_db_function();

        for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            some_other_db_function();
        }

        scope.Complete();
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   MessageBox.Show(ex.Message + " all done transactions will rollback");   
}

and inside the db functions something like this happens:

private void some_db_functions()
{
    using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
       //some processing on db
       scope.Complete();
    }
}

It is supposed to be that if there was any problem in the database transactions, like an error inserting or updating in the functions; all the transactions that had been done so far get rolled back. But it does not work like that; and although it throws an exception and the scope.Complete() in the parent function never gets triggered, still nothing get rolled back.

Where is the problem?

share|improve this question
    
you just don't need to use scope.Complete() , using the Transaction scope inside an using statement takes care of everything. –  Flowerking Feb 13 '12 at 9:15
    
are your DB methods opening a connection or using an existing one? –  Mitch Wheat Feb 13 '12 at 9:16
    
it does not. even without scope.Complete() it does not work properly. –  Siyavash Feb 13 '12 at 9:18
    
they are all using the same connection, declared previously. –  Siyavash Feb 13 '12 at 9:19
    
You shouldn't need to add a seperate TransactionScope in the some_db_functions as that method will still fall under the scope of the initial TransactionScope. What could be happening is the method is commiting the transaction but then the caller is throwing the exception but there is nothing in the callers transaction to roll back –  David Esteves Feb 13 '12 at 9:21
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

IIRC, automatic enlisting into ambient transactions happens at connection creation/opening time; if you create the transaction inside the scope of the transaction, all should be good. However:

they are all using the same connection, declared previously

if the connection exists outside of the transaction, it won't enlist.

Best practice is to create/open a connection only around a unit of work, not forever (and: let connection pooling do its job). If you follow that practice, it should work fine. So:

This won't work:

using(var conn = CreateAndOpenConnection()) {
    // ...
    using(var tran = new TransactionScope()) {
        SomeOperations(conn);
        tran.Complete();
    }
    // ...
}

where-as this should work:

using(var tran = new TransactionScope()) {
    // ...
    using(var conn = CreateAndOpenConnection()) {
        SomeOperations(conn);
    }
    tran.Complete();
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Mitch given that there's ~30 seconds between our posts, I'm pretty sure we were typing away in parallel. Yes, we concur. –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:27
    
sorry dude, long day! –  Mitch Wheat Feb 13 '12 at 9:28
    
+1 for mentioning the extra bit about not keeping connections open for long periods. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 13 '12 at 9:29
1  
@Siyavash that depends on whether you expect those child methods to be called separately. At the simplest, you could just use the encapsulating (outermost) transaction. But if you do have inner-transactions, then yes: they all need to complete before being disposed, else they instantly doom the outermost transaction. –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:53
1  
@Siyavash where exactly does it say that? if you mean the example: that is to illustrate that you can nest transactions, and if you do: essentially the outermost transaction controls "commit", and any failure controls "abort". You are not required to use transaction-scope at multiple levels, and indeed one of the most useful features of TransactionScope is that it applies to nested code automatically without having to explicitly implement any changes relating to transactions. –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:58
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If the open connection already exists it will not automatically enlist in an ambient transaction. You would have to set it explicitly.

Implicitly enlisting connections is not supported. To enlist in a transaction scope, you can do the following:

Open a connection in a transaction scope.

Or, if the connection is already opened, call EnlistTransaction method on the connection object.

Ref.

This will enlist an existing connection:

connection.EnlistTransaction(Transaction.Current)
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