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I have a RegularExpressionValidator where the only valid input is 8 characters long and consists of the letters MP followed by six digits. At the moment I have the following regex which does work

^(MP|mp|Mp|mP)[0-9]{6}$

but it feels a bit hacky. I'd like to be able to specify that the MP can be any combination of upper and lower case without having to list the available combinations.

Thanks,

David

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Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2641236/… – goodeye Feb 24 '13 at 0:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this when you define Regex object

Regex exp = new Regex(
    @"^mp[0-9]{6}$",
    RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

Alternatively you can use ^(?i)mp[0-9]{6}$ syntax, which would make just specific bit of regex case-insensitive. But I would personally use the first option (it is easier to read).

For details see documentation on msnd.

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1  
+1 but the syntay for inline options would look like this (?i) ==> @"^(?i)(mp)[0-9]{6}$" – stema Feb 13 '12 at 9:29
    
And I think the OP needed the group just for the alternation, so probably its not needed here, so @"^mp[0-9]{6}$" would be fine. – stema Feb 13 '12 at 9:31
    
@stema tnanks, I have corrected that – oleksii Feb 13 '12 at 9:31
    
I'll go with the ?i syntax because I'm not defining any regex objects, I'm setting the regular expression in an ASPX page. – dlarkin77 Feb 13 '12 at 9:33
2  
See answer stackoverflow.com/a/3063373/292060 warning that client-side validation won't work for the ?i syntax, since javascript doesn't support mode modifiers. – goodeye Feb 24 '13 at 0:28

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