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One feature of Pascal I found very useful was the ability to name a data type, eg

type
 person: record
             name: string;
             age: int;
         end;

var
 me: person;
 you: person;

etc

Can you do something similar in C#? I want to be able to do something like

using complexList = List<Tuple<int,string,int>>;

complexList peopleList;
anotherList otherList;

So that if I have to change the definition of the datatype, I can do it in one place.

Does C# support a way to achieve this?

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2  
a "using alias" in c# is per file only –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:20
    
Here's another question related to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/161477/… –  Candide Feb 13 '12 at 9:21
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's not excatly what you do in Pascal, but you can use the using-directive. Have a look here on how to use it

Example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using MyList = Dummy2.CompleXList;

namespace Dummy2
{
    public class Person 
    {
    }

    public class CompleXList : List<Person> 
    { 
    }


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyList l1 = new MyList();
        }
    }
}
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1  
minor point: the using at the top of a file are directives, not statements; the "using statement" is the thing involving IDisposable. In particular, this is a "using alias". –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:37
    
Of note: Also if you just name the class "MyList", the using directive is of course no longer required (and that also solves the original problem). –  BrainSlugs83 Oct 20 '13 at 23:07
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From the syntax shown in the initial question, it looks like you're really just asking how to make a class in C#, and not how to alias a type.

If you want a simpler name to type than List<Tuple<int,string,int>>, and you want it to be "global" (i.e. not per-file), I would create a new class that inherited said class and declared no additional members. Like this:

public class MyTrinaryTupleList: List<Tuple<int,string,int>> { }

That gives one single location of management, and no need for additional using statements.

However, I would also take it a step further, and venture that you probably don't want a Tuple, but rather another class, such as:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public int FavoriteNumber { get; set; }

    public Person() { }

    public Person(string name, int age, int favoriteNumber) 
    { 
        this.Name = name; 
        this.Age = age; 
        this.FavoriteNumber = favoriteNumber; 
    }
}

And then for your list type you can do the following:

public class PersonList: List<Person> { }

In addition, if you need other list specific helper properties or methods you can add them to the PersonList class as well.

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Yes, it's possible. You can write:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication12
{
    using MyAlias = List<Tuple<int, string, int>>;
}

or, if declared outside the namespace:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using MyAlias = System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Tuple<int, string, int>>;

namespace ConsoleApplication12
{
}

then use it as a type:

MyAlias test = new MyAlias();
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have you tried this? it will not compile (assuming List<T> is the typical one); a using alias always requires the full namespace to be specified. –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:36
    
@MarcGravell Of course I tested it, it definitely compiles and works fine. –  ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:45
    
@MarcGravell Precision: it works fine if it's declared inside the namespace scope. Updating the answer. –  ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:47
    
interesting distinction - thanks for clarifying –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:54
    
@MarcGravell, and, if all the usings are inside the namespace, which seems to be the prevailing style. The full name must be specified. –  Jodrell Feb 6 '13 at 9:29
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You can create a type:

class ComplexList : List<Tuple<int,string,int>> { }

This is not strictly the same as an alias but in most cases, you shouldn't see any differences.

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Interesting approach. Thanks –  haughtonomous Oct 16 '12 at 12:14
    
Upvoting my answer would then be a good idea ;-) –  Serge - appTranslator Oct 16 '12 at 13:34
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What about inheritance?

class ComplexList : List<Tuple<int,string,int>> {}

var complexList = new complexList();

This seems like a similar concept (with benefits).

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Yes you can do that, however you need to specify the full types, i.e. the definition becomes:

using ComplexList = System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Tuple<int,string,int>>;

This is specified per file, much like the using directives for namespaces.

nitpick: Conventionally, a type in .NET is PascalCased.

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"Full types" are not required. If other using (such as using System.Collections.Generic; are present), then "full types" are not necessary. –  ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:25
    
@ken2k incorrect; a using alias always requires it to be namespace-qualified explicitly, even if the existing using directives would bring it into scope; meaning: using var list = List<int>; is not valid, even after using System.Collections.Generic; –  Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:35
    
It's not required if the alias is defined inside the scope of a namespace, actually. –  ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:50
1  
Always learning... –  flq Feb 13 '12 at 11:01
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