Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder whether for long loops we can take advantage of tail recursion for constexpr in C++11?

share|improve this question
2  
Do you have an example to clarify what you mean? –  sehe Feb 13 '12 at 9:57
    
I read your questions as: can tail recursion be used during the compile-time evaluation of a constexpr function. Is that what you meant ? –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 9:58
    
Im sorry im in the train so i cannot provide elaborated code samples. please some one else add an example if you know.what.i mean! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 13 '12 at 9:59
3  
If it's constexpr, then it's compile time, so why would it matter? Are you afraid of your compiler running out of stack size? –  Kos Feb 13 '12 at 10:06
1  
@kos yes i am. why would it not matter? I imagine one such constexpr stackframe takes much more size that a real frame at runtime –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 13 '12 at 10:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

By the rules in [implimits], an implementation is permitted to put a recursion depth limit on constexpr calculations. The two compilers which have complete constexpr implementations (gcc and clang) both apply such a limit, using the default of 512 recursive calls as suggested by the standard. For both of these compilers, as well as any other implementation which follows the standard's suggestion, a tail recursion optimization would be essentially undetectable (unless the compiler would otherwise crash before reaching its recursion limit).

An implementation could instead choose to only count calls for which it could not apply a tail-recursion optimization in its recursion depth limit, or to not provide such a limit. However, such an implementation would probably be doing a disservice to its users, since it would be likely to either crash (due to a stack overflow) or fail to terminate on constexpr evaluations which recurse deeply or infinitely.

With regard to what happens when the recursion depth limit is reached, Pubby's example raises an interesting point. [expr.const]p2 specifies that

an invocation of a constexpr function or a constexpr constructor that would exceed the implementation-defined recursion limits (see Annex B);

is not a constant expression. Therefore, if the recursion limit is reached in a context which requires a constant expression, the program is ill-formed. If a constexpr function is called in a context which does not require a constant expression, the implementation is not generally required to attempt to evaluate it at translation time, but if it chooses to, and the recursion limit is reached, it is required to instead perform the call at runtime. On a complete, compilable test program:

constexpr unsigned long long f(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long s=0) {
  return n ? f(n-1,s+n) : s;
}
constexpr unsigned long long k = f(0xffffffff);

GCC says:

depthlimit.cpp:4:46:   in constexpr expansion of ‘f(4294967295ull, 0ull)’
depthlimit.cpp:2:23:   in constexpr expansion of ‘f((n + -1ull), (s + n))’
depthlimit.cpp:2:23:   in constexpr expansion of ‘f((n + -1ull), (s + n))’
[... over 500 more copies of the previous message cut ...]
depthlimit.cpp:2:23:   in constexpr expansion of ‘f((n + -1ull), (s + n))’
depthlimit.cpp:4:46: error: constexpr evaluation depth exceeds maximum of 512 (use -fconstexpr-depth= to increase the maximum)

and clang says:

depthlimit.cpp:4:30: error: constexpr variable 'k' must be initialized by a constant expression
constexpr unsigned long long k = f(0xffffffff);
                             ^   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: constexpr evaluation exceeded maximum depth of 512 calls
  return n ? f(n-1,s+n) : s;
             ^
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294966784, 2194728157440)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294966785, 2190433190655)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294966786, 2186138223869)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294966787, 2181843257082)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294966788, 2177548290294)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: (skipping 502 calls in backtrace; use -fconstexpr-backtrace-limit=0 to see all)
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294967291, 17179869174)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294967292, 12884901882)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294967293, 8589934589)'
depthlimit.cpp:2:14: note: in call to 'f(4294967294, 4294967295)'
depthlimit.cpp:4:34: note: in call to 'f(4294967295, 0)'
constexpr unsigned long long k = f(0xffffffff);
                                 ^

If we modify the code so that the evaluation is not required to occur at translation time:

constexpr unsigned long long f(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long s=0) {
  return n ? f(n-1,s+n) : s;
}
int main(int, char *[]) {
  return f(0xffffffff);
}

then both compilers accept it, and generate code which computes the result at runtime. When building with -O0, this code fails due to stack overflow. When building with -O2, the compilers' optimizers transform the code to use tail recursion and the code functions correctly (but note that this tail recursion is unrelated to constexpr evaluation).

share|improve this answer

I don't see why it could not be possible, however it is a quality of implementation detail.

It has been traditional to use memoization for templates for example, so that compilers no longer choke on:

template <size_t N>
struct Fib { static size_t const value = Fib <N-1>::value + Fib<N-2>::value; };

template <>
struct Fib<1> { static size_t const value = 1; }

template <>
struct Fib<0> { static size_t const value = 0; }

but instead memoize the already computed value to reduce the complexity of its evaluation to O(N).

Tail-recursion (and pseudo tail-recursion) are optimizations, and like most optimizations are not subjected to the Standard, so there is no reason it would not be possible. Whether a particular compiler uses it or not, however, is hard to predict.

The Standard says in 5.19 [expr.const]:

2/ A conditional-expression is a core constant expression unless it involves one of the following as a potentially evaluated subexpression (3.2) [...]:

  • an invocation of a constexpr function or a constexpr constructor that would exceed the implementationdefined recursion limits (see Annex B);

And reading Annex B:

2/ The limits may constrain quantities that include those described below or others. The bracketed number following each quantity is recommended as the minimum for that quantity. However, these quantities are only guidelines and do not determine compliance.

  • Recursive constexpr function invocations [512].

Tail recursion is not brooched.

share|improve this answer
    
GCC seems to use memoization when evaluating the equivalent constexpr form of the Fibonacci function as well. I wouldn't be surprised if it used the regular template instantiation machinery to evaluate constexpr functions. –  JohannesD Feb 13 '12 at 11:09
    
@JohannesD: Neither would I, memoization works great for pure functions, and both templated code and constexpr functions are pure (for the compile-time evaluated part at least). It makes sense for them to memoize, up to some limits. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 12:53

I'm not sure I understand what you're asking. If it concerns whether the compiler will convert tail recursion into a loop, it's unspecified, whether the function is a constexpr or not. If it is whether a recursive function can be a constexpr, then I don't think tail recursion is relevant. If I read the standard correctly:

constexpr unsigned ack( unsigned m, unsigned n )
{
    return m == 0
        ? n + 1
        : n == 0
        ? ack( m - 1, 1 )
        : ack( m - 1, ack( m, n - 1 ) );
}

is a valid constexpr (although I expect the compiler will complain about a lack of resources for all but the smallest n and m, at least if the function is used in a context which requires a constant expression).

share|improve this answer
    
Ah the infamous Ackermann. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 12:51

I've seen GCC perform this optimization. Here's an example:

constexpr unsigned long long fun1(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long sum = 0) {
  return (n != 0) ? fun1(n-1,sum+n) : sum;
}
fun1(0xFFFFFFFF);

Works on -O2, crashes otherwise.

Surprisingly, it is also optimizing this:

constexpr unsigned long long fun2(unsigned long long n) {
  return (n != 0) ? n + fun2(n-1) : 0;
}

I've check the disassembly of the non-conspexpr form and I can confirm that it is being optimized into a loop.

But not this:

constexpr unsigned long long fun3(unsigned long long n) {
  return (n != 0) ? n + fun3(n-1) + fun3(n-1) : 0;
}

So in conclusion, GCC will optimize into a loop the same it does for non-consexpr functions. Use at least -O2 and up.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice... portability across compilers is hard enough, I wish they would refrain from subjecting the well-formedness of a program to the optimization level :x –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 10:48
    
@Matt this program is well-formed. they just increase their implementation limits. i see no bad things here on gcc's part. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 13 '12 at 22:17
4  
This answer is simply incorrect. First, optimization levels must not (and do not in GCC AFAICT) impact constexpr evaluation. Second, the call to fun1 above is not actually a constant expression, and thus is evaluated at runtime. Try initializing a constexpr variable like so constexpr auto x = fun1(0xFFFFFFFF); and GCC will give you a very long error message. –  Chandler Carruth Feb 16 '12 at 23:31

"Tail call" is probably a misnomer to start with. constexpr functions are much closer to mathematical functions. For mathematical functions, the following two functions are identical:

constexpr unsigned long long fun1(unsigned long long n) {
  if (n == 0) return 0 ;
  return n + fun1(n-1);
}
constexpr unsigned long long fun2(unsigned long long n) {
  if (n != 0) return n + fun2(n-1);
  return  0;
}

yet from a procedural programming viewpoint they're definitely not. Only the first would appear to lend itself to tail call optimization.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.