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sorry for this noob question... let's say we have :

class TestMe
 attr_reader :array

 def initialize
   @array = (1..10).to_a
 end

end

it is then possible to do :

>> a = TestMe.new
=> #<TestMe:0x00000005567228 @x=[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]>
>> a.array.map! &:to_s
=> ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"]
>> a.array
=> ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"]
  • this clearly goes against encapsulation, doesn'it ?
  • is there any way to quickly protect the array variable from being changed ?
  • ... or do i need to implement a deep-copy reader every time my instance variable has "destructive" methods ?

EDIT i read somewhere it is "bad OO" to expose an array instance variable. If it's true, why ?

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2  
I think your original question answers your seconds question about why exposing array instance variable is not that good. –  KL-7 Feb 13 '12 at 11:32
    
@KL-7 : Totally :D –  m_x Feb 13 '12 at 13:49
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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You cannot do much with attr_reader, because attr_reader :array generates the following code:

def array; @array; end

If you don't want to expose array instance, you can return Enumerator of this array (external iterator). Enumerator is a good iterator abstraction and does not allow you to modify original array.

def array; @array.to_enum; end

What good for encapsulation and what not depends on the abstraction your class presents. Generally this is not good for encapsulation to expose internal state of an object, including internal array. You may want to expose some methods that operate on the @array instead of exposing @array (or even its iterator) itself. Sometimes this is fine to expose array - always look at the abstraction your class presents.

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many valid answers, but i chose yours because of your explanation on OO. "internal state of an object" made it clear to me... i'm self-taught so i still have a hard time wrapping my head around these concepts. Thanks. –  m_x Feb 13 '12 at 13:56
    
+1, I like the idea of calling to_enum on the array. –  Michael Kohl Feb 13 '12 at 15:29
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How about returning a copy of the original array from getter:

class TestMe

  attr_writer :array

  def initialize
    @array = (1..10).to_a
  end

  def array
    @array.dup
  end

end

In that case you can't directly modify original array but with attribute writer you can replace it with the new one (if you need).

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Any instance can become immutable by calling freeze on it:

class TestMe
 attr_reader :array

 def initialize
   @array = (1..10).to_a
   @array.freeze
 end
end

a = TestMe.new
a.array << 11
# Error: can't modify frozen array
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mmm... perhaps i have not been clear enough. What if i want my array to still be mutable, but only through a writer and not through the reader ? –  m_x Feb 13 '12 at 11:02
2  
@m_x Then don't use attr_reader and define custom getters and setters. –  Michael Kohl Feb 13 '12 at 11:30
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If you want the array to remain mutable, but not when returned through the reader, then don't return the array, but just a wrapper which exposes "safe" methods.

require 'forwardable'
class SafeArray
  extend Forwardable
  def initialize(array); @array = array; end
  # add the other methods you want to expose to the following line
  def_delegators :@array, :size, :each, :[], :map
end

class TestMe
  def initialize
    @array = (1..10).to_a
  end
  def array
    @wrapper ||= SafeArray.new(@array)
  end
end
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This is against encapsulation, but we can solve the problem by properly tuning the getter method of that attribute.

class TestMe

 def initialize
   @array = (1..10).to_a
 end

 def array
   Array.new(@array)
 end

end
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You encapsulate by creating a method with the same name as your instance variable but make it end with equals sign. In your example that would be:

def array=
..
end

In that method you do whatever it is that you want to do before assigning new values to the array

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