Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Spring MVC controller and when an exception occurs I would like to show the exception message in the view and rollback the open transactions. The view contains a form like this:

<form:form method="POST" modelAttribute="registrationForm">
    <form:errors path="*" cssClass="error-message"/>
    ...
</form:form>

I would like to show the exception message in the view, using the <form:errors ... /> feature. This is my current quite horrible solution:

@RequestMapping(value = "/registration", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public ModelAndView submitForm(@ModelAttribute("registrationForm") RegistrationForm registrationForm,
                         BindingResult result,
                         ModelAndView modelAndView,
                         HttpServletRequest request) throws Exception
{
    registrationValidator.validate(registrationForm, result);

    if(result.hasErrors())
    {
        return setupForm(modelAndView, registrationForm);
    }
    else
    {
        try
        {
            // ... Some non-transactional operations...

            // The following operation is the only one annotated with @Transactional
            // myExampleDao is @Autowired, can throw exception
            myExampleDao.createFoo(bar);

            // ... Other non-transactional operations...

            return new ModelAndView("redirect:successful");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            throw new RegistrationException(e, registrationForm, result);
        }
    }
}

@ExceptionHandler(value = RegistrationException.class)
public ModelAndView registrationExceptionHandler(RegistrationException e) throws Exception
{
    RegistrationForm registrationForm = e.getRegistrationForm();
    BindingResult result = e.getBindingResult();

    result.reject("exception", e.getMessage());
    Map<String, Object> model = result.getModel();
    return setupForm(new ModelAndView("registration", model), registrationForm);
}

private ModelAndView setupForm(ModelAndView modelAndView, RegistrationForm registrationForm) throws Exception
{
    Map<String,Object> model = modelAndView.getModel();
    model.put("currentYear", Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR));
    return new ModelAndView("registration", model);
}

The problem I'm facing is that when the exception is thrown, the transaction is not rolled back.

Can anyone help?

Thank you.

Update: slightly changed the question for better understanding

Update: found a quite horrible solution to display the exception message in the view. Still facing the problem with the transaction that is not rolled back when the exception is thrown.

Update: I changed @Transactional to @Transactional(rollbackFor = Exception.class) in the MyExampleDao.createFoo(...) method and now everything is working perfectly. This solution is still ugly IMO, does anyone have a better solution?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Don't have transactions in your controllers. Put them in your service layer.

You can create an abstract controller class that implements exception handling like so (then each separate controller extends obviously) :

public class AbstractCtrl {

    @Resource(name = "emailService")
    private EmailService emailService;

    /*
     * Default exception handler, catchs all exceptions, redirects to friendly
     * error page and send e-mail does not catch request mapping errors
     */

    @ExceptionHandler(Exception.class)
    public String myExceptionHandler(final Exception e) {
    final StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
    final PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(sw);
    e.printStackTrace(pw);
    final String strStackTrace = sw.toString(); // stack trace as a string
    emailService.sendAlertMail(strStackTrace);

    return "exception"; // default friendly excpetion message for user
    }
}

But DO NOT put transaction in your controllers, put them in Service layer classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @NimChimpsky. I need to show the exception message in the view, so your example doesn't work. That's why I do "result.reject("exception.thirdParty", e.getMessage());" in the catch. –  satoshi Feb 13 '12 at 11:48
    
@satoshi Its not difficult to add the message to model and return it with view. Why do you want to show the exception to the user, are they developers ? –  NimChimpsky Feb 13 '12 at 11:55
    
No, the exception message is a normal error that everyone can understand. The error has to be displayed in the view, which contains the registration form and the errors are shown with "<form:errors path="*" />" –  satoshi Feb 13 '12 at 11:59
    
Please see my edited question, I added some (maybe important) detail. –  satoshi Feb 13 '12 at 16:46
    
Could you explain why it's a bad idea to have transactions in the controllers? What are some bad things that can happen because of doing it that way? –  AHungerArtist Feb 13 '12 at 23:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

No one suggested a better solution than my ugly one. Here is my solution that solved the problem I had:

@RequestMapping(value = "/registration", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public ModelAndView submitForm(@ModelAttribute("registrationForm") RegistrationForm registrationForm,
                         BindingResult result,
                         ModelAndView modelAndView,
                         HttpServletRequest request) throws Exception
{
    registrationValidator.validate(registrationForm, result);

    if(result.hasErrors())
    {
        return setupForm(modelAndView, registrationForm);
    }
    else
    {
        try
        {
            // ... Some non-transactional operations...

            // The following operation is the only one annotated with @Transactional
            // myExampleDao is @Autowired, can throw exception
            myExampleDao.createFoo(bar);

            // ... Other non-transactional operations...

            return new ModelAndView("redirect:successful");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            throw new RegistrationException(e, registrationForm, result);
        }
    }
}

@ExceptionHandler(value = RegistrationException.class)
public ModelAndView registrationExceptionHandler(RegistrationException e) throws Exception
{
    RegistrationForm registrationForm = e.getRegistrationForm();
    BindingResult result = e.getBindingResult();

    result.reject("exception", e.getMessage());
    Map<String, Object> model = result.getModel();
    return setupForm(new ModelAndView("registration", model), registrationForm);
}

private ModelAndView setupForm(ModelAndView modelAndView, RegistrationForm registrationForm) throws Exception
{
    Map<String,Object> model = modelAndView.getModel();
    model.put("currentYear", Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR));
    return new ModelAndView("registration", model);
}
share|improve this answer

The only way you have to manage transaction in a controller scope, open a session from the sessionFactory.

    Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
try{
Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();
    // code

session.save(foo);


tx.commit();
}catch(Exception e){
tx.rollback();
}finally{

try{session.close();}finally{}

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.