Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Compiling this example

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main(int , char** )
{
    vector<string> test;

    test.push_back("xtest2");
    test.push_back("test3");

    ostream_iterator<string> out_it(cout, "\n");

    remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it,     
                   boost::bind(boost::algorithm::starts_with, _1, "x"));
}

fails with error

no matching function for call to 
‘bind(<unresolved overloaded function type>, boost::arg<1>&, const char [2])’

What is wrong with the used bindcall?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

no matching function for call to ‘bind(<unresolved overloaded function type>, boost::arg<1>&, const char [2])’

So,... resolve <unresolved overloaded function type>:

remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it, boost::bind(
     boost::algorithm::starts_with<std::string, std::string>, _1, "x"));

Ouput:

$ g++ ./test.cpp ./a.exe
test3

With a bit more work you can make it less ugly to type. A few variations below:

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

namespace my // for alternative styles
{
    static bool starts_with(const std::string& s, const std::string& prefix)
    {
        return boost::algorithm::starts_with(s, prefix);
    }

    struct starts_with_s 
    {
        starts_with_s(const std::string& prefix) : _p(prefix) {}
        bool operator()(const std::string& s) const {
            return boost::algorithm::starts_with(s, _p);
        }
        private: const std::string _p;
    };
}


int main(int , char** )
{
    vector<string> test;

    test.push_back("xtest2");
    test.push_back("test3");

    ostream_iterator<string> out_it(cout, "\n");

    remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it,     
                   boost::bind(boost::algorithm::starts_with<std::string, std::string>, _1, "x"));

    remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it,     
                   boost::bind(my::starts_with, _1, "x"));

    my::starts_with_s pred("x");
    remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it, pred);

    // using c++0x style lambdas
    const std::string prefix = "x";
    remove_copy_if(test.begin(), test.end(), out_it, [&prefix](const std::string& s) 
            { return boost::algorithm::starts_with(s, prefix); });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Aah, the compiler doesn't 'know' which of starts_with() two overloads I am talking about, so I got to explicitly tell him using the template arguments. Correct? –  nabulke Feb 13 '12 at 11:40
    
Indeed. Added alternative approaches in case you want to do less (ugly) typing –  sehe Feb 13 '12 at 11:45
    
Wow, thank you very much for this exhaustive answer. I think I'm gonna print it out and pin it above my desktop for future reference :-) –  nabulke Feb 13 '12 at 11:54
add comment

If your compiler supports some C++11, you can use std::bind. In C++11 you would use std::placeholders::_1, so it's probably boost::placeholders::_1 for you.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no boost::placeholders. _1 works just fine. –  nabulke Feb 13 '12 at 11:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.